How To Get Rid Of Bats In Ohio With Exclusion Devices & Bat Valves

Pictured Here Is A Bat Valve Which Is An Exclusion Device Used To Get Rid Of Bats In Ohio By The Cottoms Wildlife Removal Company. Check Ohio state regulations for laws on bat removal and times of the year that bats can legally be evicted, here.

NOVEMBER 2, 2021 – Pictured here is a “bat valve” which is an exclusion device used to get rid of bats in Ohio by the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company. Check Ohio state regulations for laws on bat removal and times of the year that bats can legally be evicted, here. Bat exclusion involves closing off and sealing bat entry points, all except for a few of the most used ones. Installing a one-way bat exclusion device such as the bat valve on each of these unsealed openings means that the bats can safely exit the attic, but cannot return.

Learn How To Remove Bats In Ohio Using Bat Valves, One-Way Bat Doors, Bat Cones And Bat Exclusion Devices And By Sealing Your Home, Attic, Walls, Vents And Chimney

YouTube Video Posted On November 1, 2021 Titled “How To Get Rid Of Bats In Ohio Using Exclusion Devices & By Sealing Your Home, Attic, Walls, Chimney”

In this video the bat control professionals at the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company of Ohio show you how to humanely get rid of and protect bats by installing exclusion devices over entrances and how to seal up holes in your house, attic, vents, garage, roof and chimney. Watch how Little brown and Big brown bats are removed from a Concord, Ohio home. Read bat exclusion guidelines from the Ohio Department of Natural Resource Division Of Wildlife, here. CWR performs bird and bat exclusion services (bat proofing) services all over the state of Ohio.

The humane (and legal) way to remove them is through a process called “exclusion.” Here’s how. The preferred method for excluding bats involves one-way exclusion devices. If you have bats in a building, learn how to safely exclude them, here. The idea behind the exclusion method is to create a one-way door the bats use to exit at sunset. However, they can’t get back in when they return before sunrise to roost. The bat valve helps bat removal experts efficiently remove bats from a building by allowing for quick attachment to structures and perfect angle placement.

If you had bats in your home over the summer, September and October are the best months for conducting a bat exclusion according to the Ohio Division of Wildlife. However, CWR removes bats from homes in Ohio all year long.

Exclusion Starts By Identifying The Holes The Bats Use For Entering The Attic

NOVEMBER 2 2021 - Property owners in Ohio, or their designee, should perform a bat watch at dawn or dusk to identify the holes the bats use for entering the attic.

NOVEMBER 2 2021 – Property owners in Ohio, or their designee, should perform a bat watch during good weather conditions at dawn or dusk to identify the holes the bats use for entering the attic. Learn how to use exclusion to remove bats from your house. Once bats move into a house, they rarely relocate. Here’s everything you need to know about the most common species of house bats, and how to use a method called exclusion to remove bats from an old house.

Bat eviction and exclusion techniques are the most effective and efficient methods of removing bat colonies and preventing recolonization. Ohio homeowners can remove bats any time of the year. However, Ohio bat laws protect flightless pups from May 16 to July 31 and outlaw exclusions at this time when 15 or more bats are in the building. You can learn bat control methods from Jim Dreisacker who is an innovator and leader in the pest control industry.

The Bat Exclusion Process In Ohio (Guidelines From The ODNR)

The bat exclusion process involves covering openings bats use to enter with netting and tubes. Bats drop down and fly out, but can’t crawl back in. Fill up holes in your attic vents, soffits, garage, ridge vents and chimney to keep bats out and to prevent bats from roosting indoors. Bat exclusion is a common sense solution to an age old problem.

NOVEMBER 2, 2021 - Pictured here is a small bat being held. Bats are flying mammals and are found in nearly every habitat throughout Ohio. In fact, most bats live near humans without ever being detected. Feeding at night, these nocturnal animals have strong senses and use echolocation (built-in sonar) to eat thousands of flying insects each night. Thirteen bat species have been recorded in Ohio, but humans often only encounter only one or two. Bats are a rabies vector species, but it is very uncommon to encounter a rabid bat.

NOVEMBER 2, 2021 – Pictured here is a small bat being held. Bats are flying mammals and are found in nearly every habitat throughout Ohio. In fact, most bats live near humans without ever being detected. Feeding at night, these nocturnal animals have strong senses and use echolocation (built-in sonar) to eat thousands of flying insects each night. Thirteen bat species have been recorded in Ohio, but humans often only encounter only one or two. Bats are a rabies vector species, but it is very uncommon to encounter a rabid bat.

Check State Regulations For Ohio Laws On Bat Removal And Times Of The Year When Bats Can Legally Be Excluded

Bat-Exclusion-Keeps-Bat-Out-Of-Houses-Attics-Roofs-Garages-Chimneys-And-Garages-Alex-Svensen-Performing-Bat-Exclusion-Work-In-Ohio

Pictured above is Alex Svensen of the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company installing a wire mesh screen on a gable vent to keep bats out of an attic in Ohio.

To remove unwanted bats ethically and effectively from a building in Ohio, place an exclusion device (bat cone) over their main entrance and seal, screen and caulk all other non-active openings.

If bats have taken up residence in your home, you may have a bigger problem on your hands than noise. Invading bats often cause structural damage and leave behind droppings that slowly corrode wood and other building materials. Exposure to bat guano can also pose a serious health risk to you and your family if ignored.

Once you know your local laws, you can take the next steps if permitted. Calling a professional pest removal service can be a good idea if you’re faced with a severe infestation, but there are also a few simple steps you can take to evict winged intruders from your property and make sure they don’t come back.

NOVEMBER 2, 2021 - Pictured here is a Bat Valve installed on a roof in Ohio by the Cottoms Wildlife Removal company. The Bat Valve is a versatile one way exclusion device used to get bats out. The Bat Valve is a one-way door device designed to aid in the removal of bats from buildings. This bat eviction tool has three options to fit over a common bat entry point: gable vents, soffit returns, ridge vents, brick openings, frieze boards, and other construction gaps.

NOVEMBER 2, 2021 – Pictured here is a bat valve installed on a roof in Ohio by the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company. The bat valve is a versatile one way exclusion device used to get bats out. The Bat Valve is a one-way door device designed to aid in the removal of bats from buildings. This bat eviction tool has three options to fit over a common bat entry point: gable vents, soffit returns, ridge vents, brick openings, frieze boards, and other construction gaps.

Install non-lethal bat valves, bat removal products, bat cones, bat excluder devices or one-way bat doors to allow the one-way passage of bats out of your home, building or structure. Exclusion devices allow bats to safely exit your house but keep them from getting back inside. Bat exclusion really works and is the best method for getting and keeping bats out of your attic.

Permanently Seal Off The Bat’s Exit Point Before Removing The Bat Valve Exclusion Device

PICTURED HERE IS TYLER PHILLIPS FROM CWR OF OHIO SEALING OFF ONE OF THE BATS EXIT POINTS IN THE ROOF WITH CAULK

NOVEMBER 2, 2021 – Pictured here is Tyler Phillips from the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company of Ohio sealing off one of the bat’s exit points in the roof with heavy duty caulk. To request professional bird and bat exclusion services in Ohio call 440-236-8114. The Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company gets bats and birds out of attics, houses, chimneys, garages, roofs, attic vents and walls in Ohio all year long.

Sturdy Materials Used To Perform Successful Bat Exclusion Work

Effective bat exclusion materials are metal screening, silicone caulk, sheet metal, expansion foam, wire mesh and insulation. Once bats are evicted, structural remediation can commence and problems such as bats accessing human occupied areas, guano and urine buildup, and potential disease issues can be professionally mitigated.

Several states now require licensing, training and/or certification before a company can offer bat management and exclusion services. Bat conservation efforts due to zoonotic diseases, population decline, and habitat loss are a driving force for these requirements.

Exclusion materials and methods for bats are less rigid than for rodents, as bats do not chew into structures. Caulk, flashing, screening, and insulation often are needed to complete an exclusion job. The combination of materials used will depend on the location, size, and number of openings and the need for ventilation. Weather stripping and knitted-wire mesh (e.g., Guard-All®, Stuf-fit®) are best applied during dry periods when wood cracks are widest. Caulk can be applied with a caulking gun (in gaps up to 0.4-inch-wide) and include latex, butyl, and acrylic compounds, which last about 5 years. Elastomeric caulks, such as silicone rubber, will last indefinitely, expand and contract, do not dry or crack, and can tolerate temperature extremes.

To prevent bats from entering chimney flues, completely enclose the flue discharge area with rust-resistant spark arresters or pest screens secured to the top of the chimney. They should not be permanently attached (e.g., with screws) in case they must be rapidly removed in the event of a chimney fire. Review fire codes before installing flue covers. Dampers should be kept closed except during the heating season.

Oakum packs easily and firmly into small cracks. Other fillers include sponge rubber, glass fiber, knitted-wire mesh, and quick-setting putty. Self-expanding polyurethane foam applied from pressurized containers can be used for openings larger than 3 inches. It must be applied carefully so clapboards, shingles, and other surfaces are not lifted. Surfaces that are exposed should be sealed with epoxy paint to prevent insect infestation and ultraviolet degradation. Conventional draft sweeps (metal, rubber) and other weather stripping supplies (felt, vinyl, metal) will seal the space around windows.

Seal Damaged Asphalt Roof Shingles With A Silicone Sealant To Keep Bats Out Before Removing Bat Valves

NOVEMBER 2, 2021 - Seal Damaged Asphalt Roof Shingles With A Silicone Sealant To Keep Bats Out Of Your House, Roof, Attic, Vents And Walls

NOVEMBER 2, 2021 – Seal damaged asphalt roof shingles with a silicone sealant to keep bats out of your house, roof, attic, vents and walls. Learn how to repair or replace roof shingles, here.

To fix curled roof shingle corners with caulking. Use a caulking gun to apply a dab of roofing sealant (about $4 per 10-oz. tube) under the corner. Weigh it down with a brick (right); leave the weight in place for at least 24 hours until the sealant dries. That’s all there is to it.

If a shingle is simply cracked or torn, you don’t have to replace it—just repair it. Start by applying a thick bead of roofing sealant under the crack. Press the shingle down and apply a second bead of sealant on top of the crack. Then spread the sealant with a putty knife.

You can hire CRW bat removal specialists to find and seal damaged shingles, construction gaps, cracks between bricks and openings that bats use to get in. CWR also installs bird netting and bird spikes for commercial customers in the state of Ohio.

Call 440-236-8114 to schedule an inspection of your home, attic and yard. Get an estimate for bird, bat and wildlife services in Ohio, here. Schedule local wildlife removal services in Ohio, here.

YouTube Video: How & When CWR Removes Bats From Attics In Ohio, Costs, DIY, ODNR Laws, Exclusion, Bat Guano Cleanup

CWR gets rid of bats for homeowners, property management companies, landlords and businesses in Columbus, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Toledo, Springfield, Akron, Zanesville, Dayton, Chillicothe, Marietta, North Royalton, Lakewood, Lima, Youngstown, Ashtabula and other cities in Ohio.

CWR excludes bats with bat valves, netting, tubes, one-way doors, non-lethal exclusion devices, materials that allow the one-way passage of bats out of the home or structure and by sealing all entry points, cracks, holes, openings, gaps and crevices.

How To Protect Bats In Ohio – Ohio Bat Laws

Bats in Ohio are important, useful, and a protected species. Lethal means of resolving bat conflicts are a last resort and only an option in unusual circumstances. In most situations, you can resolve bat related issues through exclusion of the bat colony.

The NWCOA Bat Standards Certified course is offered by NWCOA to aid in the survival and future of bats in North America and to educate those who perform bat exclusion services in residential and commercial structures.

NOVEMBER 2, 2021 - The State Of Ohio Protect All Bats - This Means That Killing Bats Is Illegal Unless A Bite Or A Potential Exposure To A Bite Has Occurred

NOVEMBER 2, 2021 – The State Of Ohio protects all bats.  This means that killing bats is illegal unless a bite or a potential exposure to a bite has occurred. All bats in Ohio are declining and protected in some form or another and cannot be intentionally harmed. Therefore, you should not kill the bats in your attic as it is illegal. However, they should be removed due to potential health concerns for humans.

To apply for exclusion authorization, please complete and return a Bat Exclusion Authorization Application (Please contact ODNR Division of Wildlife customer service at 1-800-WILDLIFE (945-3543) or wildinfo@dnr.state.oh.us for more information).

BAT EXCLUSION AUTHORIZATION APPLICATION
The purpose of this permit is to address situations where there is an immediate human health and safety risk.

Background: The purpose of this permit is to address situations where human health and safety is at risk. The exclusion of more than 15 individual bats from a structure during the time period of May 16th through July 31st requires written authorization from the Division of Wildlife (DOW) under Ohio Administrative Code (OAC) 1501:31-15-03. This restricted period is put in place to protect bats and their flightless pups during the maternity period. Exclusions conducted during this time often cause more trouble than simply waiting until pups are able to fly (August). Not only will the exclusion result in dead pups, but frantic mothers attempting to get back to their young often find their way into living spaces. However, for health and safety reasons, exclusion may be warranted.

The DOW has been delegated the responsibility under Ohio Revised Code (R.C.) Section 1531.02 to protect all wild animals and wild quadrupeds held in the public’s trust, making it unlawful for any unauthorized take of these animals. “Take”, as defined in R.C. 1531.01, is a broad definition and includes “every attempt to kill or capture and every act of assistance to any other person in killing or capturing or attempting to kill or capture a wild animal.” It is illegal to kill a bat for any reason unless a bite or potential exposure to rabies has occurred. While all of Ohio’s bat species are protected under this law, the DOW recognizes there may be times when human health or safety is at risk. As such, OAC 1501:31-15-03 outlines allowable actions the public may take for nuisance wild animal control, including the removal of unwanted bats from a man-made structure.

NOVEMBER 2, 2021 - The Cottom's Wildlife Removal Company Gets Rid Of Bats In Ohio All Year Long

NOVEMBER 2, 2021 – The Cottom’s Wildlife Removal Company Gets Rid Of Bats In Ohio All Year Long

While all of Ohio’s bat species are protected under this law, the DOW recognizes there may be times when human health or safety is at risk. As such, OAC 1501:31-15-03 outlines allowable actions the public may take for nuisance wild animal control, including the removal of unwanted bats from a man-made structure.

Allowable Exclusion Activities: If bats are entering the living space inside of a building (i.e., from attic access into a bedroom), these interior routes may be sealed or blocked at any time without a permit. However, unless otherwise approved by the DOW, exterior routes may not be sealed without first installing an exclusion device. The only allowable methods of bat removal are non-lethal exclusion devices or materials that allow the one-way passage of bats out of the home or structure. The use of glue traps and sealing all entry/exit points while bats are inside the structure, are illegal. Bats may not be intentionally killed or harmed unless rabies exposure is suspected. Exclusion devices must be left in place for at least one week. Following a final bat watch where no bats are seen exiting the structure, the device may be removed, and entrance sealed within the same day to prevent bats from reentering.

Who: Property owners and licensed/certified nuisance wild animal control operators may perform bat exclusions. It is illegal for a non-licensed person to receive compensation to perform bat exclusions.

NOVEMBER 2, 2021 - Pictured Here Is The Cottom's Wildlife Removal Company Which Is Licensed To Perform Bat Exclusions In Ohio

NOVEMBER 2, 2021 – Pictured here are some of the folks that work at the the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company, which is licensed to perform bat exclusion services in Ohio. To request professional bird and bat exclusion services in Ohio call 440-236-8114. The Cottom’s Wildlife Removal Company gets bats out of attics, houses, attic vents, chimneys, garages, roofs, soffits and walls in Ohio.

Authorization Request Process: Before applying for bat exclusion authorization, the property owner or designee must 1) inspect the structure for bats; and 2) perform two bat watches at the structure for one hour at dawn and/or one hour at dusk within a 7-day period. If 14 or fewer bats are observed each night and/or found to be present, exclusion may occur at any time of year. If 15 or more bats are observed on at least one night and/or found to be present between May 16-July 31 and the property owner cannot wait to exclude them until after July 31st, the property owner/designee may apply for bat exclusion authorization. The DOW will consider immediate exclusion in situations where human health and safety is at risk. Applicants must allow 5-business days for review and processing.

Rabies: Bats may not be killed or euthanized unless a bite or potential exposure to rabies has occurred. If rabies is suspected in a bat or a bite cannot be ruled out, contact your doctor and follow instructions of the Ohio Department of Health or your local county health district for preserving and submitting the bat carcass for testing.

Please contact 1-800-WILDLIFE with questions regarding bat exclusion authorization.

Methods To Exclude A Colony Of Bats With Bat Valves And Exclusion Devices

NOVEMBER 2, 2021 - To Request Humane Bat Removal, Bat Cleanup, Bat Guano Removal, Bat Control And Bat Exclusion Services In Ohio To Get Rid Of Bats Call-440-236-8114

NOVEMBER 2, 2021 – Pictured here is a colony of bats in an attic. Bat exclusion involves covering the openings the bats use to enter with netting or tubes. The bats can drop down and fly out, but are unable to crawl back in again. Successful bat exclusion involves attaching netting over the entrance to where bats get in (usually a hole or crack). Check with your local wildlife agency for any state restrictions or guidelines before excluding a colony of bats. To request humane bat removal, bat cleanup, bat guano removal, bat control and bat exclusion services in Ohio to get rid of bats call 440-236-8114 any time of the day or night.

It is illegal to seal all the entry points and exit points when bats are roosting inside and attic or house in Ohio. In Ohio, it is illegal to exterminate, euthanize or kill bats for any reason unless a bite or potential exposure to rabies has occurred. Bats that roost in buildings can be evicted using special exclusion techniques to remove a bat colony either before or after maternity season.

In some instances bat colonies in a building may not cause any real problems and can be left undisturbed. In fact, a small colony of bats may go unnoticed for years. If bats become a nuisance for a home or building owner a bat exclusion has proven to be the only successful method of permanently removing them. An exclusion is conducted by positioning one-way devices at the locations where the bats are emerging from the roost. The one-way devices allow the bats to exit, but prevents them from re-entering. Physically capturing bats and relocating them is almost never successful because bats are often hiding in areas of the building that are not accessible. Even if bats are in an open area, attempts to capture them will likely cause them to flee into inaccessible places. Trapping bats as they exit a building does not work either because bats are frequently injured or die in the process of being captured and transported to a new location. Furthermore, bats moved to another location will almost always return to their old roost, even if it requires flying many miles.

Bats don’t make holes to get into buildings; they use entry points we leave open. Small openings or narrow gaps high on houses allow bats to enter. Bats may also enter under loose-fitting doors, around windows and through gaps around conduits and utility vents. Successfully evicting bats can be challenging. A knowledgeable professional who understands bat behavior and laws protecting bats may be your best option.

Bats roost in buildings throughout Ohio. Buildings give bats protection from predators, stable temperatures and safe shelter to rest and raise their young. Bats have species-specific roost needs and preferences that vary by season, region, climate and activity. Some bat species use man-made structures like buildings and bridges to complement their selection of natural roosts. Other species must use buildings when natural roosts like caves and hollow trees are in decline or no longer available.

Bats get into attics and homes in Ohio by following cold air currents that are drawn inside due to cracks and holes in houses

Bats get into attics and homes in Ohio by following cold air currents that are drawn inside due to cracks and holes in houses. Bats use existing openings (cracks as small as 1 ¼ inch by 3/8 of an inch) to enter buildings or to roost in attics.

Bat biologists and the pest control industry have long known that exclusion is the best method of dealing with nuisance bat colonies in buildings. While the pest control industry used toxicants on bats in the past, first DDT dust and later chlorophacinone tracking powder (RoZol), it was always recognized as only a temporary solution that could cause more problems than the original bat colony. Sick and dying bats were often found on the ground throughout the neighborhood of the building that was treated with pesticides, thereby increasing human and pet exposure to the bats. This is an important consideration when toxicants are discussed to eradicate a color where an individual bat was found to be rabid. Poisons would be more likely to increase the risk of human exposure to rabies than eliminate it, while killing numerous rabies-free bats. Poisoned bats very often died in inaccessible parts of the building and created an odor and fly problem for the residents of the building. For these reasons, since 1991 there are no lower airy toxicants registered in the United States for bat control.

It is important to remember that there are two phases to exclusions of nuisance bat colonies. The natural seasonal exodus or human-mediated eviction of the bats from the structure must be followed by permanent modification of the structure so the bats cannot return. When excluding a bat colony from a building, it is important to identify all the entry points so they may be closed.

A bat watch is useful in locating these openings. A bat watch is simply watching the structure at dusk with several observers or one observer on several nights and noting all the locations where bats exit the building. It is also important to conduct a close inspection of the rest of the structure to find and close structural defects that the bats may use as alternate roosting sites when the exclusion is begun.

The resolution of bat vs. human conflict is achievable with appropriate exclusion techniques conducted at the appropriate time of year. Exclusion is the best means of removing bats from buildings and other manmade structures. When an exclusion has to be postponed due to the bat birthing season, take the time to educate the homeowner as to why the delay is necessary. Trapping bats in the structure can cause odor problems, fly infestations, and staining problems of walls or ceilings as the dead bats decompose. As more and more bat colonies are excluded, the use of artificial bat roosts or bat houses may become more important as both a bat management tool and pest control service. It is apparent that bat colonies are often being moved from house to house within a neighborhood. The use of well-designed bat houses, installed in appropriate locations, may be the best means of protecting populations of these beneficial native mammals while stopping the continuous game of bats-in-the-attic tag.

Safely And Humanely Remove Bats From Your House—And Help Them Out Where They Belong

Remove, exclude, control and relocate “pests” like bats humanely with the utmost compassion and care.

This video made by bat control specialists in the Buckeye State shows you the steps to permanently get rid of bats. The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) dictates that nuisance bat species in Ohio are protected and can’t be intentionally harmed. Don’t kill, eliminate or exterminate bats in your attic with poison, bug bombs, chemicals, sprays, fumigants or glue traps because it’s illegal.

How To Exclude Bats In Ohio (Information From the Ohio Department Of Natural Resources)

NOVEMBER 2 2021 - To apply for exclusion authorization in Ohio please complete and return a Bat Exclusion Authorization Application

To apply for exclusion authorization, please complete and return a Bat Exclusion Authorization Application (Please contact ODNR Division of Wildlife customer service at 1-800-WILDLIFE (945-3543) or wildinfo@dnr.state.oh.us for more information).

There are 10 bat species commonly found in Ohio and they are all insectivores, meaning they eat insects. Bats are the only major predator of night-flying insects and they help farmers by saving them billions of dollars a year on pest control. Bats are usually able to exist near human homes without making their presence known. However, with decreasing amounts of habitat available for bats (e.g., trees being cleared), bats may find their way into man-made structures. Bats use existing openings (cracks as small as 1 ¼ inch by 3/8 of an inch) to enter buildings or to roost in attics. To remove unwanted bats from a building, you must place an exclusion device over their main entrance and seal all other holes. Exclusion devices allow bats to safely exit the house but keeps them from getting back inside. After leaving the device up for several days and ensuring all bats are gone, the device can be removed and the last exit sealed.

NOVEMBER 2, 2021 - Pictured here is a rescued Big brown bat. Get Information On Wildlife Rescue And Rehabilitation Centers And Services In Ohio Here

NOVEMBER 2, 2021 – Pictured here is a rescued Big brown bat. Get information on wildlife rescue and rehabilitation centers and services in Ohio, here.

In order to protect flightless bat pups, it is unlawful to perform an exclusion between May 16-July 31 if there are 15 or more bats inside a structure. In situations where human health and safety is at risk, a property owner/designee may seek written authorization from the Chief of the Division of Wildlife to perform an exclusion during the restricted period. Before applying for authorization, the property owner/designee must inspect the property for bats and perform two bat watches at dawn or dusk at the structure within a 7-day period. To apply for exclusion authorization, please complete and return a Bat Exclusion Authorization Application (Please contact ODNR Division of Wildlife customer service at 1-800-WILDLIFE (945-3543) or wildinfo@dnr.state.oh.us for more information).

To Request Professional Bird And Bat Exclusion Services In Ohio Call 440-236-8114. The Cottom's Wildlife Removal Company Gets Bats And Birds Out Of Attics, Houses, Chimneys, Garages, Roofs And Walls In Ohio All Year Long.

To Request Professional Bird And Bat Exclusion Services In Ohio Call 440-236-8114. The Cottom’s Wildlife Removal Company Gets Bats And Birds Out Of Attics, Houses, Chimneys, Garages, Roofs And Walls In Ohio All Year Long.

Occasionally, a bat may get into your house. If one does, there is no need to panic. Open a window or exterior door, and close interior doors, confining it to one room if possible. The bat will leave as soon as it locates the exit. If the bat continues to stay in the house, we recommend calling a professional to have it removed. If you decide to remove the bat yourself, the “shoebox method” is the best way to do that without physically handling the bat. Grab a shoebox, or some sort of sturdy container and place it over the bat, whether on the floor or wall. Then, slip a lid or piece of cardboard under the box. Take the box outside and place it up against a tree so that the bat can crawl out onto the tree as bats cannot fly from the ground. This method works well in the spring, fall and summer, but if it is the middle of winter, it is advised that you contain the bat in a box with a small blanket or towel and call a local wildlife rehabilitator. Rehabilitators that can handle bats are the rabies vector species certified rehabilitators listed on our orphaned and injured wildlife page. You should never handle the bat with bare hands, so wear the thickest gloves you can find, preferably leather or fireplace gloves. Then, determine how the bat got into the house and seal the opening(s).

If you have a colony of bats in your house, normally in the attic, it would be good a time to call a professional company to come to your house and carry out an exclusion. The most popular and recommended form of exclusion is a one-way door. This allows for the bats to leave on their own, as they would to forage at night, and then they would not able to get back into the house. When installing a one- way door, it is advised that you also bat-proof your house. Bat-proofing is a way to close off all possible entrances in a house. Due to the small areas that bats can fit into, it is best to have a professional do this.

All bats in Ohio are declining and protected in some form or another and cannot be intentionally harmed. Therefore, you should not kill the bats in your attic as it is illegal. However, they should be removed due to potential health concerns for humans. Feces from bats and birds can hold a lung infection disease known as histoplasmosis. For this reason, it is advised that after excluding the bats, the attic is thoroughly cleaned with proper protective gear. For more information about histoplasmosis, you can visit the Center for Disease Control website.

As previously mentioned, a large reason that bats make use of buildings for roosts is due to lack of otherwise available habitat. The Division of Wildlife strongly suggests placing a bat box up outside to replace the lost habitat of an attic. This will not only provide additional habitat, but it will prevent bats from trying harder to seek entrances in your home. Bat houses should be placed approximately 15 to 20 feet (no lower than 10) off the ground on a tree with approximately 7-9 hours of daylight. Bat boxes should have dark stains in order to soak in as much of the sun’s warmth as possible. These bat boxes are easy to put up and can provide a home for more than 100 bats. If you would like to put up a bat house in your own backyard, you can visit the Bat Conservation International website.

Signs A Bat Is In Your House Or That Bats Have Infested Your Attic

NOVEMBER 2, 2021 - Signs A Bat Is In Your House Or That Bats Have Infested Your Attic - Droppings On Attic Insulation - Bats Flying Around Your House At Sunrise Or Sunset - Smell Of Amonia - Bat Guano - Chirping Noises, Scratching Or Squeking Sounds - Scratches On Walls - Stains On Attic Walls From Uring - Presence Of Stains Around Exit And Entry Points - Dead Bats On Your Property

NOVEMBER 2, 2021 – Signs A Bat Is In Your House Or That Bats Have Infested Your Attic – Droppings On Attic Insulation – Bats Flying Around Your House At Sunrise Or Sunset – Smell Of Ammonia – Bat Guano – Chirping Noises, Scratching Or Squeaking Sounds – Scratches On Walls – Stains On Attic Walls From Urine – Presence Of Stains Around Exit And Entry Points – Dead Bats On Your Property

There are obvious and clear signs that your house has a bat infestation. Bats are nature’s exterminators. But as great as they are for the ecosystem, they pose a health hazard if they take up residence in your attic. Here’s what to look for.

Scratching sounds in your walls or ceiling is a sign that you have bats living with you. Look for dark brown stains around your vents, roofline, roof trim and dormers. If you find one bat, there may be more. Droppings in your attic, poop on your insulation, flapping wings, stains on walls, grease marks, hearing squeaking noises and ammonia smells are signs you’ve got bats in the belfry. Bats hide in walls and attics in the day and roost indoors when it’s cold.

If you suspect you may have bats roosting in your home, look and listen for these signs to confirm a bat presence:

  • Squeaking and rustling noises in ceilings and walls. (These sounds also come from mice and squirrels.)
  • An entrance hole with a dirty stain below it. The hole can be as narrow as ¼ inch.
  • Droppings around sidewalks, ledges, patios, or under rafters. The black or brown droppings are similar to the size and shape of rice grains and are made of insect parts.
  • Bats emerging from the building in the evening.

Exclusion is the best and most permanent method of removing bats from unwanted areas.

How Do You Know If You Have A Colony Of Bats?

Stand outside from 10 minutes before sunset until 20 minutes after and look for spaces where bats might emerge, like attics, soffits and eaves, An energy audit will spotlight crevices in need of insulation — likely the very spaces where bats are getting in.

But before covering any openings, it’s best to attach a one-way “excluder” made from netting or sheeting that allows bats to escape but not regain entry. Allow a week for all of the bats to exit before filling crevices with foam or caulking.

Unlike rodents, bats do not chew through walls to gain entry, nor do they chew on electrical wiring. The only permanent solution to keeping bats out is exclusion.

Never seal entry points when bats might be trapped inside. Flightless young may be present from mid-April through mid-August, but most bats will leave for winter.

Why And Where Bats Hide In Houses And Attics – Call 440-236-8114 To Request An Inspection To Find Bats In Your Attic 

NOVEMBER 2, 2021 - Bats hide in attic spaces because they prefer warm and secluded areas to raise their young and to roost. Before these creatures get into your attic, they may get into your garage, attic vents, roofline, chimney, eaves or soffits. To get bats out of your attic, identify their entry and exit points, making sure not to seal them while the bats are inside.

NOVEMBER 2, 2021 – Bats hide in attic spaces because they prefer warm and secluded areas to raise their young and to roost. Before these creatures get into your attic, they may get into your garage, attic vents, roofline, chimney, eaves or soffits. To get bats out of your attic, identify their entry and exit points, making sure not to seal them while the bats are inside. To request an inspection of your attic in Ohio, call 440-236-8114.

Bats can easily squeeze into tiny cracks and construction gaps. Watch this video, to learn how how bats get in houses, attics and basements. Because of their nocturnal nature, bats prefer dark locations like attics, garages, attic vents, chimneys and basements. In Ohio, attics are a cozy home for Big brown bats and Little brown bats because they prefer to live in sheltered and dry places. If you see oily streaks around your ceiling or on your soffits, this may be a sign you have bats in your attic.

Big Brown Bats And Little Brown Bats In Ohio

The fur on a little brown bat is a sleek, glossy brown, ranging from dark brown to reddish brown on the back with slightly paler, grayish under parts. As with the little brown bat, the big brown bat’s (Eptesicus fuscus) name is highly descriptive. Its fur is uniformly light to dark brown on the upper parts, with slightly paler under parts. The fur is long and silky in appearance, compared to other Ohio bats. The muzzle is not furred. The ears and wing membranes are dark brown to black, and they have relatively large heads with shorter rounded ears compared to the Myotis.

Humane Bat Control Services, Bat Guano Removal Services And Attic Insulation Removal And Replacement Services In Ohio

To request humane bat removal and bat control services to get rid of bats in Ohio, call 440-236-8114 to schedule an inspection of your home, property or business. CWR provides professional bat removal and attic cleanup and attic restoration services in Cleveland, Akron and northern Ohio. CWR removes bat guano and bat feces from attics in Ohio. Get information about attic sanitizing and disinfecting services, here. CWR cleans and sanitizes basements for homeowners in Ohio.

CWR provides attic decontamination services, animal feces and bat guano removal services to residential and commercial customers throughout the state of Ohio. CWR attic remediation specialists also remove and replace insulation in attics for customers throughout the Buckeye State. Some of the best insulation (blown-in and batt) installers in Ohio work for CWR.

Conservation Effort From Clearcreek Elementary Students Provides Bat Houses For Local Park
Published by Dayton 24/7 Now on March 6, 2021
Written By Tiffany L. Denen

LEBANON, Ohio (WKEF/WRGT) — After a months-long project, Clearcreek Elementary first-grade students gathered at Lebanon Armco Park on Saturday on a very special conservation mission.

Starting in Fall 2020, the first-grade students began learning all about bats and how important they are to the environment. “They learned that bats are not the scary creatures that we have a tendency to think about them as,” explained their teacher, Laura Parlett. Two in the students in particular, Rian and Declan, were thrilled to share some of the knowledge they had learned, explaining that they eat bugs “which are very bad”. Parlett added that she had been teaching her students about how bats are seed dispersers and also help keep the insect population down.

After learning about bats and how important they are, the students wanted to help out and make a difference, so the school reached out to see if any nearby parks needed any bat houses – and the students were thrilled to donate them. “The students took it to the next level and did a conservation action by getting bat houses built,” explained Melissa Proffitt, the education and communications specialist for Warren County Soil and Water Conservation District.

Throughout Ohio, there are ten different species of bats, six of which hibernate in the area through the cold winter months. Now that spring is starting to return, they will be coming out of their hibernation caves and looking for roosts and shelters. The new bat houses are going to help give bats that shelter that they need, especially during the time of year when they need it most. Plus, as Proffitt pointed out, it helps reduce the human wildlife conflicts. “People will sometimes get bats in their attics or in their barns where they don’t want the, so having a bat house – an alternative structure – that we do want the bats in really helps to reduce those conflicts,” she said.

Thanks to the effort of the students, Lebanon Armco Park has 19 new bat houses hung on poles around the property. And the Warren County Park District Nature Programs is inviting people to come visit as part of a scavenger hunt and see if they can find them all. “Just make sure to look with your eyes but please do not disturb,” said Proffitt.

Thanks to the effort of the students, Lebanon Armco Park has 19 new bat houses hung on poles around the property. And the Warren County Park District Nature Programs is inviting people to come visit as part of a scavenger hunt and see if they can find them all. “Just make sure to look with your eyes but please do not disturb,” said Proffitt.

To Request Professional Residential And Commercial Insulation Services In Cleveland And Northeast Ohio Call 440-236-8114 - CWR Installs Blown-In Insulation, Blanket Batts And Rolls, Fiberglass Batt Insulation, Cellulose Insulation, Foam Board (Rigid Foam Panels) And Spray Foam Insulation

Professional Residential And Commercial Insulation Services In Cleveland And Northeast Ohio – CWR Installs Blown-In Insulation, Blanket Batts And Rolls, Fiberglass Batt Insulation, Cellulose Insulation, Foam Board (Rigid Foam Panels) And Spray Foam Insulation

CWR professionals excludes bats from houses, attics, apartments, garages, roofs, crawl spaces, chimneys, buildings, walls, multifamily residential properties, structures and basements in Ohio by using professional, legal and humane bat exclusion techniques, bat exclusion methods and materials. CWR provides bat removal, attic cleanup and exclusion services to homeowners in Columbus and central Ohio.

Benefits Of Bat Houses

NOVEMBER 2 2021 - Bat houses provide an alternative space to keep bats from nesting in the eaves or attic of your home.

NOVEMBER 2, 2021 – Bat houses provide an alternative space to keep bats from nesting in the eaves or attic of your home.

Bat houses are a good way to keep bats in the area after an exclusion has taken place. Bat houses provide an alternative space to keep bats from nesting in the eaves or attic of your house but still will attract these beneficial mosquito-eaters to your yard where you want them. A single bat can capture 500–1,000 mosquitoes in an hour. In many ecosystems, bats are a key pollinator.

One of the best things you can support bat conservation is to install an artificial roost, like a bat house. Because bat populations have decreased significantly, bat houses can be a great way to provide secure roost sites for bats. Bats provide many benefits to humans and the environment, and they need your compassion and assistance.

Bat houses are particularly helpful in providing alternative roosting habitat for bats that are excluded from homes. In turn, this reduces the chance of human contact with bats. Installing a bat house on your property can provide a safe environment for bats, while protecting your yard from pest insects, like mosquitoes, moths, and beetles.

Bat houses give females a safe, warm place to raise their young. Since most female bats only have one pup each year, bat populations grow very slowly. Additionally, due to habitat loss and degradation, it is becoming harder for bats to locate natural roost sites to raise their young. By installing a bat house, you can provide mothers and their pups with a safe home.

These artificial roost sites provide clean homes for bats that are free of White-nose syndrome. A greater presence of bats means fewer pesticides are needed, therefore reducing the amount of chemicals released into the environment.

Learn how to buy, build and maintain a bat house, here.

Who Gets Rid Of Bats In Ohio

Pictured Here Are Two Bat Removal And Exclusion Specialists From The Cottom's Wildlife Removal Company Of Ohio

Pictured Above Are Two Of Ohio’s Most Experienced Bat Control Professionals, Alex Svensen and Tyler Phillips, Both Of Whom Love Working With Homeowners Throughout Ohio To Solve Their Bat Problems

The Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company (440-236-8114) gets rid of bats throughout the State of Ohio, all year long. However, we do not exclude colonies of bats (15 or more bats) from homes, apartments, structures, buildings and businesses in the Buckeye State between May 16 and July 31, to protect flightless pups.

Call the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company at 440-236-8114 for professional help to get rid of bats. CWR provides expert bat removal, cleanup and exclusion services in Cleveland, Cincinnati, Akron and Columbus all year long. CWR also removes pigeons, birds and bird nests for customers in Cleveland, Akron and throughout Ohio.

To get an animal out of your house or off your property in Ohio, please contact the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company. You can call 24/7. To talk with animal control experts and wildlife experts from Ohio call 440-236-8114. For emergency bat, animal and wildlife removal services in Ohio, call 440-236-8114.

NOVEMBER 2, 2021 - Pictured Here Are Tyler Phillips And Alex Svensen From The Cottom's Wildlife Removal Company Removing And Excluding Bats From A House In Ohio

NOVEMBER 2, 2021 – Pictured Here Are Tyler Phillips And Alex Svensen From The Cottom’s Wildlife Removal Company Removing And Excluding Bats From A House In Ohio

See who removes bats in Kettering, Elyria and Cuyahoga Falls, North Olmsted, Findlay, Warren, Westerville, Garfield Heights, Shaker Heights, Austintown and Massillon.

The video “How & When CWR Removes Bats From Attics In Ohio, Costs, DIY, ODNR Laws, Exclusion, Bat Guano Cleanup” explains DIY bat removal and prevention.

Searching online for “bat removal near me”? In Dayton, Toledo, Youngstown or Middleton, call CRW to request an inspection of your home. CWR repairs damage caused by bats and wildlife in Ohio.

In Lakewood, Newark or Euclid, call CWR to get bats out of wall voids and apartments. In Lorain, Hamilton, Gahanna, Mansfield, Green or Springfield, call 24/7 for emergency bat removal. Talk to the best bat removal company in Grove City, Riverside, Solon, North Royalton, Reynoldsburg and Lancaster. Get information on wildlife trapping services in Ohio, here.

Mike Cottom Jr. (President) and Mike Cottom Sr. (1986 founder) are 2 bat control experts at CWR. They replace insulation, decontaminate, clean up, remediate and repair attics in Beavercreek, Strongsville, Brunswick, Xenia, Fairborn, Avon Lake, Barberton and Cleveland Heights.

How Much Does Bat Exclusion Cost In Ohio?

DIY bat exclusion kits run from $25 to $150.

Costs to remove a single bat from a home in Hilliard, Upper Arlington, Zanesville, Wooster, North Ridgeville, Mason, Lima and Marion start at $399. Average costs for bat removal and bat exclusion for a one story house are $1,495 to $3,000, $1,995 to $8,000 for a two story home and $2,995 to $40,000 for a commercial building or church.

Costs to remove bat guano from walls start at $895. If you see signs of a bat infestation or bat colony, call CWR for an assessment.

For bat proofing and bat exclusion services in Fairfield, North Royalton, Bowling Green, Huber Heights and Delaware, Ohio call 440-236-8114.

Call CWR for bat removal services in Stow, Troy, Sandusky, Perrysbug, Avon, Medina, Athens, Boardman, Marysville, Westlake. Call CWR for wildlife removal, pest and animal control services in Akron, Parma, Dublin, Canton, Kent, Mentor.

Find out how and when bat colonies can be removed in Centerville, Willoughby, Maple Heights and Wadsworth, Ohio, here.

Hire The Best Bat Exclusion Company In Ohio

PICTURED HERE ARE 6 PROFESSIONAL BAT CONTROL EXPERTS AND ATTIC RESTORATION SPECIALISTS IN OHIO - HIRE THE BEST BAT CONTROL COMPANY IN OHIO - Pictured Here Are 6 Professional Bat Control Experts And Attic Restoration Specialists In Ohio - This humane bat removal company picture was taken in Cleveland, Ohio on May 26, 2021. Shown in the picture (left to right) are Kyle Fortune, Tyler Phillips, Alex Svensen, Nathan Lang, Mike Cottom Jr. and Jason Neitenbach. CRW is a local (Ohio only) bat control service (Ohio only) that does not exterminate bats or use live traps to catch bats. Rather, bats are safely removed from homes and buildings in Ohio using multiple bat exclusion processes, one-way bat doors (bat valves), bat exclusion devices, funnels, netting and tubes. The 6 men pictured above certainly know how to get rid of bats in houses. First, they identify all the areas where bats get in. Then they remove unwanted bats from buildings by placing exclusion devices over the main bat entrance and by sealing all the other roof gaps and soffit holes. This means that the roof, eaves and attic are sealed except for primary exits which are outfitted with one-way bat doors which allow bats to exit but prevent re-entry. Costs to hire a bat removal specialist in Ohio start at $239. Bat exclusion costs in Ohio start at $1,495. Some pest control companies and exterminators in Ohio, such as Terminix and Orkin offer bat removal services but they these bat removal companies specialize in controlling rodents and insects and don't have the experience and range of equipment required that the Cottom's Wildlife Removal company possesses.

PICTURED HERE ARE 6 PROFESSIONAL BAT CONTROL EXPERTS AND ATTIC RESTORATION SPECIALISTS IN OHIO – This humane bat removal company picture was taken in Cleveland, Ohio on May 26, 2021. Bat removal specialists shown in the picture (left to right) are Kyle Fortune, Tyler Phillips, Alex Svensen, Nathan Lang, Mike Cottom Jr. and Jason Neitenbach. Bats can live up to four decades and come out on warm nights to find insects. To schedule an inspection and consultation in Ohio, contact the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company.

It is recommended that Ohio homeowners call a specialty bat control company to inspect their home if they see a bat inside a living space.

CRW is a local (Ohio only) bat control service that does not exterminate bats or use live traps to catch bats. The wildlife professionals at CRW will not kill your bats. Rather, bats are safely removed from homes and buildings in Cleveland, Columbus, Toledo, Dayton, Canton, Mansfield, Hamilton, Springfield, Lancaster and Cincinnati, Ohio through the wise use of bat exclusion processes and devices.

CRW bat control “wizards” use multiple bat exclusion processes, one-way bat doors (bat valves), bat exclusion devices, funnels (cones), netting and tubes to get bats out.

The 6 bat removal masters (pictured here) that work at the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company certainly know the tricks to getting rid of bats in houses.

One secret trick to get rid of a single bat in a living space is to open a window or door, eureka!

These 6 gentlemen pictured here are very well educated for performing bat exclusion, bat eviction, bat venting and bat poop cleanup services. Alex, Kyle, Nathan, Mike, Tyler and Jason know how to clean environments contaminated with bat droppings in residential and commercial structures.

CRW bat control specialists know how to minimize the potential for transmission of white-nose syndrome (WNS) when handling bats.

They take all the necessary precautions when handling bat waste. CRW bat control technicians can see the signs and damage caused by various species of bats.

CWR bat control technicians use the best protective particulate respirator masks when removing bat droppings from outside houses, attics, walls and cars. Learn more about acceptable management practices for bat eviction and structural remediation, here.

PICTURED HERE IS TYLER PHILLIPS, A BAT NETTING INSTALLATION EXPERT FROM OHIO - CRW bat exclusion professionals like Tyler Phillips, install knotted bat netting, mist bat netting and extruded bat netting for customers in Ohio and all across the United States. Bat netting is not easily broken, ripped or chewed through. Strong bat netting is an humane method to exclude bats from roosting sites in buildings, houses, eaves, attics and garages. These types of netting are made UV stabilized materials and do not injure bats.

PICTURED HERE IS TYLER PHILLIPS, A BAT NETTING INSTALLATION AND BAT EXCLUSION EXPERT FROM OHIO HOLDING A TUBE OF SILICONE CAULK

CRW bat exclusion professionals like Tyler Phillips, install knotted bat netting, mist bat netting and extruded bat netting for customers in Ohio and all across the United States.

Bat netting is not easily broken, ripped or chewed through.

Strong bat netting is a humane method to exclude bats from roosting sites in houses, buildings, churches, warehouses, barns, yards, apartments, offices, cabins, attics, eaves, chimneys and garages.

These types of netting are made from UV stabilized materials and do not injure bats.

Professional grade bat netting should be attached during the evening (when the bats are gone) with staples or duct tape and extend about 6 inches beyond the opening that bats use to enter the attic or structure.

This will allow bats to crawl out but not be able to find a way back in when they return from foraging on insects.

About CWR Bat Exclusion Services In Ohio

Bat exclusion involves using netting or tubes at entry points, which allows bats to drop down and fly away but which prevent re-entry. Exclusion devices are left in place for a week, so that the bats give up. After the bats are gone, plugging, sealing and caulking work is done.

Caulking A Roof To Keep Bats Out - Pictured here is Alex who is a bat removal and bat exclusion expert at the Cottom's Wildlife Removal company in Ohio.

Caulking A Roof To Keep Bats Out – Pictured here is Alex who is a bat removal and bat exclusion expert at the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company in Ohio.

To keep bats out, the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company seals cracks and openings with heavy-duty bat control screen mesh, aluminum flashing, sheet metal, expandable foam, caulk, stainless steel hardware cloth, chimney caps, flue guards, adhesive sealants, 3/8″ polyethylene knotted mesh, bat netting and other bat exclusion products.

CWR Uses Professionally Equipped Bat Exclusion Vehicles

Ohio Bat Removal Truck - Pictured here is a Cottom's Wildlife Removal truck in front of Jacob's Field In Cleveland, Ohio - These trucks are used by CWR bat removal experts to get rid of many types of bats year-round from Ohio houses and attics. These trucks carry tools and exclusion devices that are used to seal up homes and to "exlude bats". CWR provides professional live bat removal, bat exclusion and bat pest control services for homeowners and businesses in Ohio. Many shapes and sizes of one-way valves and netting are stored in these trucks.

Ohio Bat Removal Truck – Pictured here is a Cottom’s Wildlife Removal work truck in front of the home of the Cleveland Indians, Progressive Field In Cleveland, Ohio

These pest control trucks are used by CWR bat removal experts to get rid of many types of bats year-round from Ohio houses and attics. These trucks carry a variety of bat control supplies, ladders, catch poles, tools and exclusion devices that are used to get bats out and seal up homes to “exclude” bats. Bat guano removal gear is packed in these trucks.

Disinfecting, decontamination and sanitizing supplies are stowed away in these bat control trucks. Many shapes and sizes of one-way bat valves, flanges, bat cone excluders, exclusion strips, stainless steel mesh and netting are stored in these trucks. CWR provides professional live bat removal, bat exclusion and bat pest control services for homeowners and businesses in Ohio.

How Does A Bat Control Company Get Rid Of Bats In Ohio?

First, CRW bat control experts identify all the areas where bats get in. Then they remove unwanted bats from buildings by placing exclusion devices over the main bat entrance and by sealing all the other roof gaps and soffit holes. Bats can live in houses in Ohio for years or decades before a homeowner notices them.

This means that the roof, eaves and attic are sealed except for primary exits which are outfitted with one-way bat doors which allow bats to exit but prevent re-entry.

CRW BAT REMOVAL TRUCK IN THE DRIVEWAY OF A CINCINNATI HOME - Pest control companies in Ohio that specialize in bat removal, bat control and bat exclusion always arrive at a customer's location properly equipped for the job. The Cottom's Wildlife Removal truck pictured here arrived fully loaded with ladders, one way doors, heavy leather gloves, silicone caulking, coveralls, caulking guns, wire mesh, hardware cloth, exclusion devices, enzyme odor removers, hard hats, Tyvek suits, boots, goggles, catching nets, mist nets, telescoping cage nets and other personal protective equipment (PPE).

CRW BAT REMOVAL TRUCK IN THE DRIVEWAY OF A CINCINNATI HOME

Pest control companies in Ohio that specialize in bat removal, bat control and bat exclusion always arrive at a customer’s location properly equipped for the job.

The Cottom’s Wildlife Removal truck pictured here arrived fully loaded with ladders, one way doors, heavy leather gloves, silicone caulking, coveralls, caulking guns, wire mesh, hardware cloth, exclusion devices, enzyme odor removers, hard hats, Tyvek suits, boots, goggles, catching nets, mist nets, telescoping cage nets and other personal protective equipment (PPE).

Behold, The Benefits Of Ohio’s Bat Population
Posted On Farm and Dairy On August 27, 2021
Written By Barbara Mudrak

The little brown bat is one of the bat species listed as endangered in Ohio, and one of the 12 species susceptible to white-nose syndrome, a fungus that has killed more than 5 million bats in North America since 2006. However, studies show that little brown bats are changing their hibernation habits, sleeping alone instead of in clusters. The National Science Foundation says this may help them fend off the fungus and avoid extinction.

Bats have been getting a bad rap for hundreds, maybe thousands of years.

A Greek playwright referred to a bat from hell coming to suck a camel’s blood in 417 B.C. Bram Stoker cemented their connection to evil when he had Dracula turn into a bat — among other things — in his 1897 novel.

Essential

But contrary to the myths that have built up around them, bats don’t attack humans or get tangled in their hair, and vampire bats don’t suck blood, just lick it. Instead, bats are essential to many ecosystems ranging from rainforests to deserts and are a boon to agriculture.

Bats disperse seeds and pollinate hundreds of species of plants. And because some of them eat roughly their own body weight in insects every night, they reduce crop damage and the need for pesticides.

According to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, bats eat enough harmful insects to save this country’s corn industry $1 billion a year. While many bat species eat insects, some feed on nectar and pollinate high-value crops like peaches, bananas, cloves and agave, a key ingredient in tequila.

Still, other species eat fruit and thus disperse seeds. Scientists say they may account for 95% of the seed dispersal responsible for early growth in recently-cleared rainforests.

Further benefits

Funded by the National Science Foundation, scientists have been studying other ways that bats benefit humans. For instance, their use of echolocation — emitting high-frequency sounds that bounce off objects, allowing them to navigate and find prey in the dark — inspired sonar and ultrasound.

Bats are the only mammals that can fly on their own power, not relying on air currents. Unlike those of birds and insects, bats’ wings fold when they fly, like a human hand, which allows them to do a 180 with just three flaps. Studying the structure and dexterity of their wings may someday help improve the maneuverability of aircraft.

Bat researcher and neuroscientist Seth Horowitz says even the much-maligned vampire bat may help us in new ways. As they lick the blood that results from puncturing an animal’s skin with their tiny canines, they emit a substance that prevents the blood from clotting. Studying this substance may lead to new ways to prevent or treat blood clots in humans, he said.

Ohio bats

In a video for The Ohio Bat Working Group, Marne Titchenell, Extension Wildlife Program Specialist with The Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, describes “A Year in the Life of an Ohio Bat.”

Bat Habitat and Life Cycle by Marne Titchenell, The Ohio State University Extension
Video Posted On YouTube On January 7, 2021 by the School of Environmental and Natural Resources (SENR.OSU.edu)

From April through September, bats need somewhere to sleep or “roost” during the day. After all, they’re nocturnal and fly around and eat all night, she said.

For the hoary bat — the largest bat species in Ohio — and silver-haired and Eastern red bats, that means hanging upside down in the canopy of a tree. Because they prefer to socially isolate when they snooze, they are called solitary bats.

Other species like to roost in big groups called colonies. If their resting place is in a forest, they’ll sleep in hollows or holes in trees, or under bark that has pulled away from the trunk. The larger groups are made up of females and are called maternity colonies, while males form smaller bachelor colonies.

However, bats that hang together don’t limit themselves to trees. They can also form colonies under bridges, in the eaves of buildings or barns, or in attics. More on that later.

The colonial species that hang out in Ohio include little brown bats, big brown bats, Northern long-eared bats and Indiana bats. Of the four, all but big brown bats are on the state’s endangered list, Titchenell said.

Bats mate in the fall but don’t give birth until the following year. Females are able to delay fertilization so that the young, called pups, will be born when insects are available.

The pups are born in May and June and are pretty chunky, about 20 to 30% of the mom’s body weight. She puts a lot of energy into nursing them until they can fly and catch insects on their own, which takes at least a month. The females only have pups once a year. They can have between one and three, but the number is more often one. That’s because bats can live up to 30 years, “so they don’t have to have so many young per year. They can take their time,” Titchenell explained.

Ohio bats hibernate from October through March, she said. The solitary bats are more likely to migrate further south to do that and some, like the hoary bat, may travel long distances, even to Mexico or Central America.

Colonial bats may migrate, but don’t travel as far. Some stay in Ohio, hibernating in caves, abandoned mines and crevices in cliff walls, she said.

Dangers to bats

Some bats want their own space and hibernate alone, while others gather in huge clusters for their winter naps. That’s not a good thing when it comes to white-nose syndrome, a fungus that has killed an estimated five million bats in North America since it was first documented in a popular tourist cave in New York in 2006. Since the fungus comes from Europe, scientists think a visitor brought it to the cave on clothing or equipment.

As bats hibernate, the fungus grows on their muzzles, wings and other body parts, causing skin lesions and, ultimately, death. Studies show that casualties in populations of solitary sleepers level off at some point, but not in populations that hibernate in clusters.

As if white-nose syndrome isn’t bad enough, those charged with counting the casualties of wind turbines are finding more bats than birds, especially so-called tree bats. Scientists so far have found no explanation.

Meanwhile, other bat populations are suffering because of loss of habitat or other environmental changes, including declines in insect populations.

Great efforts are being made to conserve bats, including getting a better handle on their numbers and locations. From 2011 to 2020, staff and volunteers with the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Wildlife did acoustic surveys to monitor bat populations in the wake of white-nose syndrome. This year, their methods were changed to follow the standards of the North American Bat Monitoring Network or NAbat, which is designed to monitor 47 bat species on the continent of North America, sending statistics to an international database.

House bats

Since bats are protected in Ohio, it’s important to know what you can do — and when — if you discover a colony of bats in your attic. There are ways to evict them, like bat cones that allow them to go out but not back in. Or, you can make an exclusion device out of mesh netting.

“But it’s important that you don’t close them up, or prevent nursing moms from coming back in and feeding their pups,” said Erin Hazelton, Wind Energy Administrator for the ODNR Division of Wildlife.

In fact, it’s illegal in Ohio to exclude bats between May 16 and July 31, when females might be caring for offspring. That is, unless the Division of Wildlife gives permission.

“If they’re in the house, that’s a different story,” Hazelton said. “We don’t ask people to live with bats. They can have rabies, although the incidence is very low.”

The Ohio Department of Health says if you do find a bat in the house and wonder if it has come in contact with people or pets, call your local health department and an animal control agency so the bat can be captured and tested.

“Our bats need help,” Hazelton stressed. There are things that homeowners and landowners can do, like building bat boxes where bats can roost and females can have pups. The internet is full of instructions, she said.

Sarah Stankavich, a wildlife technician with the DOW who is also part of the Ohio Bat Working Group, made a video on creating a bat garden. In it, she suggests planting native flowers that bloom during the late day or night such as blue vervain, goldenrod, evening primrose and phlox. Bats also like herbs such as mint, marjoram, rosemary, chives and lemon balm, she said.

Bats don’t land to drink, so they need an unobstructed source of water, like a small pond or pool. A birdbath will do, as long as it is full.

Stankavich advises maintaining large trees, especially if they have cavities or loose bark for roosting, and, if possible, having some natural (unmowed) lawn. Don’t get rid of raked leaves in the fall, but keep them in piles; bats, butterflies, beetles and moths all benefit from leaf litter, she said.

The Ohio Bat Working Group, which has a Facebook page, and Bat Conservation International are good sources of information. They also have more ideas for those who want to help bats be more than doppelgangers for Dracula.

Do Bats In Ohio Carry Rabies?

Rabid bats have been documented in all 49 continental states. Bat-strain rabies is present everywhere in Ohio with rabid bats having been identified from nearly all of Ohio’s counties over the years. Bats are a rabies vector species, but it is very uncommon to encounter a rabid bat. Bats are increasingly implicated as important wildlife reservoirs for variants of rabies virus transmitted to humans.

It is important to protect yourself from rabies while helping protect a threatened species. Local wildlife experts say you should not be afraid when you see a bat, but you should be educated about the virus.

Bats are also branded as carriers of disease, particularly rabies. There are 1-2 rabies infections in the U.S. per year.

Histoplasmosis And Bats

Histoplasmosis is an infection that is caused by breathing in spores of a fungus often found in bird and bat droppings. Histoplasmosis is a lung disease that is caused by the fungus Histoplasma capsulatum. Histoplasmosis is caused by Histoplasma, a fungus that lives in the soil, particularly where there’s a large amount of bird or bat poop.

Bat And Guano Removal Services For Ohio Homeowners And Businesses

For Bat Guano Removal Services For Ohio Homeowners And Businesses Call 440-236-8114 To Request A Home And Attic Inspection

The incidence of histoplasmosis being transmitted from bat droppings to humans is not thought to be very high. Nevertheless, fresh bat droppings (unlike fresh bird dropping) can often contain the histoplasmosis fungus. Bat droppings do not need to come into contact with soil to be a source of this disease.

Are Bats In The Attic Covered By Insurance In Ohio

Is bat exclusion covered by homeowners insurance in Ohio? Homeowner’s insurance does not normally cover bat removal exclusion services in Ohio, but some policies cover the cost of attic restoration services. Homeowners insurance will not cover the cost to remove a bat or any other wild animals or birds from your home. But in some cases, it may pay for damage caused by bats, especially if the damage was “sudden and accidental.”

Co-Existing With Bats In Ohio

Bats come out in Ohio and are active March through September. Some Ohio residents call the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company to ask if one bat in their house means they have more.

Despite being well known for their pest control abilities, bats remain understudied and misunderstood, and their numbers have been on the decline for various reasons. Now research is showing that these mammals may be invaluable to farmers.

HIRE THE BEST BAT CONTROL COMPANY IN OHIO - Bats in Ohio are beneficial because they feed on and help to control many agricultural pests. The exclusion of more than 15 individual bats from a structure in Ohio during the time period of May 16th through July 31st requires written authorization from the Division of Wildlife (DOW) under Ohio Administrative Code (OAC) 1501:31-15-03. To apply for a bat exclusion authorization, please complete and return a Bat Exclusion Authorization Application to the Ohio Division of Wildlife. You can also contact ODNR Division of Wildlife customer service at 1-800-WILDLIFE (945-3543) or email wildinfo@dnr.state.oh.us. To schedule an inspection and a bat exclusion service contact the Cottom's Wildlife Removal company at 440-236-8114 in Cleveland or Northern Ohio, 614-300-2763 in Columbus or Central Ohio or 513-808-9530 in Cincinnati or Southern Ohio. Bat in Ohio are not dangerous and they will not attack you. Bat-strain rabies is present everywhere in Ohio with rabid bats having been identified from nearly all of Ohio's counties over the years. The 6 bat removal specialists pictured here provide reliable bat control solutions to Ohio businesses and homeowners to get rid of bat colonies and bat guano. Homeowner's insurance does not normally cover bat removal exclusion services in Ohio, but some policies cover the cost of attic restoration services.

HIRE THE BEST BAT CONTROL COMPANY IN OHIO – The 6 bat removal specialists pictured here provide reliable bat colony control solutions and bat guano cleanup services to Ohio businesses and homeowners. Bats in Ohio are beneficial because they eat insects and feed on many agricultural pests. The exclusion of more than 15 individual bats from a structure in Ohio during the time period of May 16th through July 31st requires written authorization from the Division of Wildlife (DOW) under Ohio Administrative Code (OAC) 1501:31-15-03. To apply for a bat exclusion authorization, please complete and return a Bat Exclusion Authorization Application to the Ohio Division of Wildlife. You can also contact ODNR Division of Wildlife customer service at 1-800-WILDLIFE (945-3543) or email wildinfo@dnr.state.oh.us. To schedule an inspection and bat exclusion services contact the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company at 440-236-8114 in Cleveland or Northern Ohio, 614-300-2763 in Columbus or Central Ohio or 513-808-9530 in Cincinnati or Southern Ohio. Bats in Ohio are not dangerous and they will not attack you. Bat-strain rabies is present everywhere in Ohio with rabid bats having been identified from nearly all of Ohio’s counties over the years.

CWR bat control experts advise our clients that there is a good chance there are more bats in the walls or attic, if one is seen inside the house. Bats rarely fly in through open doors and their presence on a wall or ceiling is probably an indication of a minor or major bat infestation.

A thorough inspection is recommended to find out if there are more bats in the house.

Humans and bats can live in peace with each other. Bats are flying mammals that are found in nearly every habitat throughout Ohio.

Ohioans should not fear bats simply because they enter attic spaces, construction gaps and wall voids looking for shelter. Most bites occur happen when people try to grab a bat with their bare hands.

The Little brown bat is Ohio’s most common species of bat. Two Ohio bat species live in houses and attics; the Big brown bat and the Little brown bat.

In Ohio, bats normally hibernate from late October to early April in caves, houses, walls, barns, churches, bridges, abandoned mines, cracks in large rock outcroppings or attics and buildings.

Bats in Cleveland, Ohio include the Eastern Red Bat, the Big brown bat, the Northern Long-Eared bat, the Little brown bat and the Tri-colored Bat.

The Hoary bat is the largest bat found in Ohio and most widespread American bat. The Hoary bat can weigh up to 35 grams.

In Ohio however, the Little brown bat population size has declined dramatically due to habitat loss and a deadly disease (fungus) known as White-nose Syndrome (WNS).

The deadly white-nose syndrome has been found on bats in Cuyahoga and Geauga County parks in Ohio.

Some colonies of brown bats removed in Ohio by licensed wildlife control specialists at CWR may total a dozen or more.

Bats are mammals that use adapted forelimbs as wings to fly and they are more maneuverable than birds.

The Ohio Division of Natural Resources classifies bats as a nuisance species. Some of the most common species of bats that the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company gets out of attics and homes in Ohio are colonial bats such as Big brown bats,

Little brown bats and Mexican free-tailed bats.

According to Barbara French, a biologist with Bat Conservation International, many people have a few bats in their attic and never know it.

But a large colony of bats can become a noise or odor nuisance. And bats should not be allowed to enter interior living quarters.

Damage Control: Bat-proofing

Bat-proofing a building involves sealing the bats’ entrance holes and providing the colony with an alternate roost, or bat box. To bat-proof your home, (1) stage a ‘bat watch’ to identify bat entrances, (2) seal the holes to prevent their entry, and (3) provide an alternative roost, or bat box, for the colony to occupy.

Identifying Entrances

The first step in bat-proofing is to locate the holes that bats use to enter and exit the attic. Bats commonly enter at points where joined materials have warped or pulled away from one another, such as louvered vents with loose screening, the roof peak, and areas where flashing has pulled away from the building.

To identify which of these areas provide access, look for bat droppings on the side of the house below a suspicious crack or crevice. Entrances that have been used for a long time may have a slight brown discoloration at the edges. Inside the attic, bat droppings often accumulate below bat entrances and exits. During the day, turn off the attic lights and look for openings where outside light is visible. Bats may be entering through these openings.

Staging a bat watch can also help you locate bat entrances. At dusk, station a person on each side of the building and watch as the bats exit the building. Once the first bats are seen leaving, focus on that area of the building and watch for other exiting bats until you have pinpointed their exit(s).

Sealing Entrances

Once the bat entrances have been located, the next step in bat-proofing is to seal these openings. Use window screening or hardware cloth to cover louvered vents or large gaps and cracks in the building. To fill smaller cracks, use expanding foam insulation or caulking compound. After hardening, these can be trimmed or painted. Unlike mice, bats will not gnaw new holes in the building, so sealing the existing holes will keep them out. Most bat-proofing materials can be obtained in local hardware or building supply stores.

TIMING OF BAT-PROOFING

One important aspect to consider before bat-proofing your building is the timing of the procedure. Because pups remain confined in the roost until they are old enough to fly, bat-proofing should never be completed from late May through mid-July. Otherwise the young, flightless bats would be trapped inside the building. Bat-proofing during these months would result in potential health risks and obvious odor problems as the young bats die and decay inside the building. Also, the pups may enter human living areas in search of a way out, and females may frantically attempt to reenter the building to rejoin their young.

Occasionally, a homeowner may encounter the difficult situation of bat-proofing while the pups are still confined to the attic. This can happen when a roofing or siding contractor discovers bats at the worksite but cannot stop the project. In this case, the contractor should complete the project, but allow one of the bats’ access points to remain open, so that nursing females can enter and exit the attic. Then, after the pups are able to fly, a one-way door can be installed to evict the bats. Once all of the bats have left the attic, the remaining bat entrance can be sealed.

The best time for bat-proofing is in the spring, before bats enter the roost, or in the fall, after the bats have left. If bat-proofing must be done while bats are inhabiting the building, it should be done by installing a one-way door after mid-July when the pups are able to fly. One-way doors, which are discussed later, are designed to allow bats to leave and not reenter a building.

STEPS IN BAT-PROOFING

  • January-April: Seal entrances before bats return to the building.
  • May-August: Watch bats to identify entrances. Do not seal the openings.
  • August-October: Install one way door(s).
  • November-December: Seal entrances once bats have left the building. (If you suspect bats are hibernating in the building, install a one-way door in September or October.)

One-way doors are pieces of mesh fastened over a bat entrance to form a long sleeve or tent. These doors allow bats to exit at night but prevent their reentry at dawn.

INSTALLING ONE-WAY DOORS

  • Choose ¼ to ½ inch mesh (wire or plastic) to cover the bats’ points of entry. Cut the screening so that it covers the width of the hole and extends approximately 3 feet below the hole. The screening should project 3 to 5 inches clear of the hole, so that the bats can crawl between the screen and the building and exit at the bottom.
  • Secure the mesh at the top and sides with duct tape or staples and leave the bottom open.
  • Leave the door in place for at least three to four days, or until you are sure that all bats have left the building, then remove the one-way door and permanently seal the opening.
  • Again, never use a one-way door from May through August, or young bats will be trapped inside and die.

Providing an Alternative Roost

Bat-proofing has two potential drawbacks. First, exclusion can be very stressful for a maternity colony. Once excluded, the bats may move into a nearby building, where they may be expelled again, or even exterminated. Also, displaced colonies will not relocate in buildings that already house other maternity colonies. If a displaced colony cannot find a new roost, it may leave the area. Over time, excluding bat colonies can contribute to serious declines in local bat populations.

The second drawback is that homeowners may find it difficult to completely bat-proof their homes. Bats can crawl through a crack as small as ½ by 1¼ inches, so persistent bats may find a way to reenter their traditional roost.

Bat boxes may solve both of these problems because they provide substitute roosting sites for maternity colonies. With bat boxes, the bats get a safe roosting site outside the home, while homeowners still benefit from the bats’ control of insects. For detailed information on building bat boxes, refer to the Penn State publication A Homeowner’s Guide to Northeastern Bats and Bat Problems, available from county extension offices in Pennsylvania.

BAT BOX DESIGN

A bat box must be large enough to house a maternity colony. Therefore, boxes should be at least 7 inches deep, 24 inches wide, and 12 to 24 inches in height (depending on the size of the colony). Inside the box, several baffles divide the interior space into multiple roosting crevices. The crevices should measure from ¾ to 1 inch in depth. All interior surfaces, including the baffles and the landing board below the box, should be roughened with saw cuts to provide footholds for bats. Bat boxes should be stained dark brown to enhance the box’s ability to absorb sunlight.

BAT BOX PLACEMENT

Bat boxes should face southeast or southwest, so that they receive at least seven hours of direct sunlight per day during the spring and summer. A bat box intended to house a displaced maternity colony should be placed on or very near the building from which the bats were evicted. Place the box on a wall or chimney, or on a pole within 10 to 20 feet of the building. The box should have at least 3 feet of open space under it, so that bats can enter and exit from the bottom. Do not place a bat box in an area that is heavily trafficked by people, or anywhere that droppings from the box will pose a problem. Bat boxes also can be placed on trees–as long as the boxes will receive the required seven hours of sunlight. Whether on a building, pole, or tree, bat boxes should always be placed at least 10 to 15 feet above the ground.

Once the bats move into the box and establish it as their roost, the box can gradually be moved farther away from the building. This should be done in the fall or winter when bats are not present. Moving the box more than 20 yards per year is not recommended.

TIMING OF INSTALLATION

Ideally, bats should be allowed to familiarize themselves with the bat box before being expelled from their traditional roost. This can be done by installing the box in the winter or spring, then allowing the bats to remain in the attic over the summer. Bat-proofing should be completed in the fall after the bats have left the building. The following spring, when the bats return, they will not be able to get into the building, but they will be familiar with the bat box and ready to inhabit it. This timing of events makes the task of bat-proofing easier for the homeowner, because the bats should be less persistent in trying to reenter the house.

BAT BOX TIMING

  • January-April: Install a bat box near the building in a location where it receives seven hours of sunlight.
  • May-August: Allow bats to remain in the building and watch them exit at dusk to identify openings.
  • September-April: Seal openings.

Legal Status

Because bats feed on insects, they are beneficial and should not be needlessly destroyed. Bats are protected when flying and hibernating. However, if bats are causing problems in a building, it is left to the homeowner’s discretion to solve the problem.

Toxic chemicals should never be used for bat control because they cause dead and dying bats to be scattered throughout the building, yard, and neighborhood, thus increasing the chance of contact between bats and people. Currently there are no toxicants registered for bat control in Pennsylvania. Chlorophacinone, also called tracking powder or Rozol, can no longer be used legally for bat control. Naphthalene, also called moth balls or moth flakes, is registered as a bat repellent. This repellent may be useful when bats are in very confined areas such as crawl spaces or between walls, but is not very useful in large open areas such as attics. Also, bats will recolonize a building once the repellent wears off.

Public Health Concerns

The incidence of rabies in the wild bat population is low, and the spread of rabies within individual colonies appears to be very rare. Surveys of wild bats in the United States and Canada indicate that the incidence of rabies in clinically normal bats is less than 0.5 percent. However, of the sick, dead, or suspect bats submitted for testing. Thus it is import to take precautions when handling grounded bats.

Rabies Precaution

Bats of all sizes will bite in self-defense, but they almost never attack people. If you must handle a bat, take the following precautions to minimize the chance of being bitten.

  • Wear leather gloves and scoop the grounded bat into a container to prevent the bat from biting you.
  • If you are bitten by a bat, immediately wash the bite with hot, soapy water and call a physician. If there is any possibility that you have been infected, the physician will recommend rabies shots. Today, most people receive the rabies vaccine in a series of five relatively painless shots in the arm administered over a one-month period.

Summary

With a little patience and effort, you can exclude bats from your building permanently and successfully, without the expense of hiring a professional pest-control service. With a bat box, you can take advantage of the bats’ ability to control insects, while making a valuable contribution to the protection and management of these beneficial mammals.

Learn How You Can Help To Protect Bats In Ohio

The Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company of Ohio is trying to help protect bats in Ohio and to spread awareness – and so can you. Learn what is being done and how you can help protect bats and their habitats!

With terrifying threats like White Nose Syndrome, bats face a tremendous fight for survival. Populations are declining worldwide at an alarming rate – some species are becoming so rare they are hardly ever seen at all. Bats need all the help they can get and Conserve Wildlife Foundation (CWF) offers some simple ways to get involved and make a difference.

Since there are so many different threats facing bats, there are also many ways that they can be helped through conservation initiatives. Organizations all over the world are working to protect groups of bat species in different regions; the most effective methods of conservation will vary depending on the region and the biggest issues there.

The reduction of habitat loss is key to saving bats. Bat surveys should be undertaken before altering an area of forest of caves, and this should be implemented around the world on a local scale. Initiatives are also underway to reduce harmful tourism activities in bat caves and encourage the use of bat boxes in forests and gardens.

Bats are legally protected. Legal protection of bats varies widely around the globe. In the U.K. and most European countries, all bat species and their roosts are protected – including bats who have roosted in buildings – by domestic and international legislation. In North America, bats have protections in their natural environments and some laws protect bats when they occupy a home or building. However, several species of conservation concern such as little brown bats and Florida bonneted bats might be found in man-made structures.

Be sure to check with your local wildlife agency about restrictions on timing or method of removal.

We need bats if we want healthy and diverse ecosystems filled with a variety of organisms. Many bats feast on insects, some pollinate plants, and some bats spread seeds, too.

Try some of these ideas to help conserve bats.

  • Learn more about bats. One of the most important things you can do to help bats is to learn more about them and share what you learn with your friends and family. Check out these fun Bativities for some ideas. Bat Conservation International and BatWeek.org both provide a lot of information about bats and ways you can help.
  • Use iNaturalist. With an app on your smartphone, you can take part in citizen science by observing bats in a park or in your own backyard. Learn more about iNaturalist and add your own observations.
  • Build a bat house. Bats are running out of good places to roost, rest, and raise young. A backyard bat house will provide shelter they desperately need in your neighborhood or community. In national parks, staff work to protect natural habitat for bats to live in instead of building bat houses. Learn more.

In Parks

  • Stay out of caves when directed. The bats at risk for WNS often hibernate or raise young in caves. They need to be undisturbed so they can rest and raise their young. Also, it is actually unlawful to enter most caves on public lands.
  • Decontaminate before going in a cave. It may be possible for humans to spread WNS from one cave into another. Be sure to listen to rangers’ directions for cleaning (or leaving behind) your shoes, backpack, and gear before entering a cave.
  • Tell a ranger if you see bats acting strangely. Rangers can take steps to protect both bats and people if a bat is behaving in an unusual way.

And no matter where you are, you can celebrate Bat Week in October every year!

March through September is the active time for bats in Ohio. Learn about monitoring and protecting Ohio bats.

A great way to help bat populations in Ohio is to build a bat house and count the number of bats that use the house. Being mindful and minimizing the disturbance of bat habitats or places that bats are known to hibernate helps their over-all population and ecosystems. A big factor that increases bat populations is to avoid the possible spread of White Nose Syndrome by people. Bats slowly reproduce, female bats typically have one pup at a time, so it is important for us to do whatever we can to protect our bats.

Bat roost monitoring surveys are used to identify locations where bat maternity colonies are roosting and determine the approximate size of the colonies. The data helps to understand where the bats are living and how the populations are changing. Little brown bats used to be the most common species of bats in Ohio; their population has declined by as much as 99% according to winter hibernacula counts.

If you have a colony of bats in your house, normally in the attic, it would be good a time to call a professional company to come to your house and carry out an exclusion. The most popular and recommended form of exclusion is a one-way door. This allows for the bats to leave on their own, as they would to forage at night, and then they would not able to get back into the house. When installing a one- way door, it is advised that you also bat-proof your house. Bat-proofing is a way to close off all possible entrances in a house. Due to the small areas that bats can fit into, it is best to have a professional do this.

If a bat is in your house and you have any question about whether the bat has been in contact with people or pets, you will want to have the bat captured and tested. Call your local health department and animal control agency for assistance. If professional assistance is not available, please follow the steps described in this video to safely capture the bat and save it for testing.

It is important to know that bats are protected in Ohio. Bat species are listed on both state and federal endangered species lists. Some bat species in  Ohio are listed on both state and federal endangered species lists. Federally listed threatened and endangered bat species are of importance to caves and mines. Six North American bats are listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973.  All of these federally listed species are dependent upon caves or abandoned mines during all or part of the year.

These include the Florida Bonneted Bat, Gray bat, Indiana bat, Ozark Big-Eared Bat, Virginia Big-Eared Bat, Lesser Long-Nosed Bat and the Mexican Long-Nosed Bat.

Four species — the tri-colored bat, the little brown bat, the Indiana bat and the northern long-eared bat — are on Ohio’s endangered list. The northern long-eared bat is federally listed as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act. The Indiana bat was added to the U.S. list of endangered and threatened wildlife and plants on March 11, 1967 due to drastic declines in the species’ population. Under the Endangered Species Act, listing protects the Indiana bat from take (harming, harassing, killing) and requires Federal agencies to work to conserve it.

New Bat Protection Rules Backed By Ohio Energy Group, Environmentalist Organization
Published by Ideastream Public Media on January 18, 2016
Written by Brian Bull

New federal rules will go into effect next month to protect a bat species ravaged by a fungal disease over the past decade. And two Ohio groups back the protections issued by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

With 30 states including Ohio reporting White Nose Syndrome, the quandary has been how to protect bat populations while not overly restricting development and forestry practices.

The new regulations make it illegal to harass, harm, or kill bats in affected areas. They also ban tree-removal within a quarter mile of such areas, and protect trees where young bats roost in June and July.

Shawn Bennett with the Ohio Oil and Gas Association (OOGA), supports the new federal rules. He says they allow – under certain conditions — for clearing land for pipeline development, among other energy activities.

“In Ohio, industries will still be required to do bat surveys to ensure they are not impacting areas where bats reside, and the rule still will not allow for oil and gas industries or any others to clear trees during summer months if near known roost sites.”

The Great Lakes Chapter of the National Wildlife Federation, also backs the rules. The NWF’s Frank Szollosi says bats devour many pests harmful to crops in the state.

“White Nose Syndrome itself is across all of Ohio’s 88 counties,” says Szollois. “It’s important not just to oil and gas, real estate developers, but I would think that Ohio agriculture would be supportive of efforts to protect a species that provides such incredible ecosystem services to farmers.”

But other industry and environmental groups aren’t as receptive. The Independent Petroleum Association of America says the rules will drive up costs and hurt production, while the Center for Biological Diversity says it may challenge the regulations in court as insufficient protection for the mammals.

White Nose Syndrome disrupts the hibernation cycle of several species of bats, which has caused many to starve in the winter months. The northern long-eared bat has been particularly hit, with mortality rates hitting 90 to 100 percent of those affected, including those in Summit County’s Liberty Park.

The new regulations take effect February 16th.

Ohio Bat Working Group
Communication and collaboration between bat-minded people.

Coexisting with Bats
Bats are critical to the health of natural ecosystems and human economies around the world, providing seed dispersal, pollination, and pest control services. Unfortunately, bats are often viewed in a negative light, stuck in a stigma that has been created and reinforced by literary and cinematic culture. In truth, bats are harmless and highly beneficial, and coexistence between bats and humans is critical to maintain the ecosystem services bats provide.

Like most wild animals, bats prefer to be left alone and avoid human contact. However, there are times when bats and humans cross paths and conflict or questions arise. The below resources are provided to help in such situations.

Bats in Buildings
The most effective solution to remove unwanted bats from a building is exclusion. This method involves placing one-way exclusion devices over the main access point(s) of the building. In Ohio, it is unlawful to perform an exclusion between May 16-July 31 if there are 15 or more bats inside a structure. A colony of 15 or more bats is likely a maternity colony (females with young), so exclusion is restricted in order to protect flightless bat pups. In situations where human health and safety is at risk, a property owner/designee may seek written authorization from the Chief of the Division of Wildlife to perform an exclusion during the restricted period. Visit here for more information.

What to do if you find a bat:

During the summer, bats are out flying almost every night hunting insects. Seeing bats flying around at dusk and throughout the night, especially under lights, is normal behavior. If you find a bat on the ground that appears sick, injured, or in need of care, contact a wildlife rehabilitator. Wildlife rehabilitators are trained professionals that care for wildlife until they can be returned to the wild.

Ohio Wildlife Rehabilitators in Ohio

Bats and Diseases
Bats are meticulous groomers and should never be mistaken for dirty animals. However, bats, like most mammals, can contract the rabies virus (though few ever do). Bats are also not alone from other wild animals in being a potential source of human disease. Please visit the below sites for more information on bats and diseases.

Rabies (the following information is from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

Bats and Covid-19

Bats and histoplasmosis (the following information is from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

10 Ways to Be A Friend to Bats [Information From The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service – Midwest Region Endangered Species]

Be a citizen scientist. Reduce pesticide use. Join a bat conservation organization. Your steps can make a difference.

  • Be a bat ambassador!
  • Reduce pesticides
  • Promote natural bat habitat
  • Protect water quality
  • Put up a bat house
  • Be a citizen scientist
  • Avoid disturbing bats
  • Safely remove or exclude bats
  • Help out
  • Find out more

1. Be a bat ambassador!

Learn more about bats, and share what you learn with family or friends. Bats get a bad rap and we need your help dispelling myths about bats and helping people learn about these fascinating and beneficial animals. Spread the word … bats aren’t scary!

2. Reduce pesticides

All of the bats that live in the Midwest eat insects – a single bat can eat up to 3,000 insects in a night! Bats are primary predators of night-flying insects, including many pest species. Feed a hungry bat by minimizing the use of pesticides in your lawn and garden.

3. Promote natural bat habitat

Around your home leave dead and dying trees where they don’t create a hazard … these are favored roosting sites for bats.

4. Protect water quality

Protect streams and wetlands to provide clean water sources and good foraging areas for bats.

5. Put up a bat house.

Instructions can be found on Bat Conservation International’s website at www.batcon.org/resources/getting-involved/bat-houses

6. Be a citizen scientist.

Many Midwestern States have bat-related citizen science projects. Examples are acoustic bat monitoring and summer bat roost counts. Contact the natural resource agency in your state to learn what is available.

7. Avoid disturbing bats.

Stay out of caves and mines where bats are hibernating in winter. If a bat is disturbed during hibernation, it may arouse and become active. This increased activity can lead to starvation if the bat’s fat reserves are used up before winter is over.

8. Safely remove or exclude bats

If a bat accidently flies into your home, try to remove it safely without harming the bat. If bats take up residence in your home, use humane methods to exclude the bats. If you contact a professional to help with bat exclusion, be sure to ask them if they use humane methods. Safe removal methods can be found on the Organization for Bat Conservation website at batconservation.org/learn/bat-in-your-house/. Safe and humane exclusion methods can also be found on their website at batconservation.org/learn/nuisance-bats/.

9. Help out

Join an organization that focuses on bat conservation.

10. Find out more

Find out more about white-nose syndrome, a disease that has killed millions of bats, and help to avoid possible spread of WNS by humans.

Endangered Bat Species In Ohio Means No Tree Cutting

If you want to cut down a tree, April to October is probably the wrong time to do so.
Published by the Tribune Chronicle on April 25, 2021
Written by Nathanael Hawthorne

If you want to cut down a tree, April to October is probably the wrong time to do so.

That is according to Sarah Stankavich, bat survey coordinator with the Ohio Department of Natural Resources.

Various endangered species of bats are using trees to nest during that time, she said. By cutting down trees, it could be detrimental to the already dwindling species that call Ohio home.

Four species — the tri-colored bat, the little brown bat, the Indiana bat and the northern long-eared bat — are on the state’s endangered list. The northern long-eared also is on the federal endangered list.

From April 1 until Oct. 1, ODNR encourages that trees not be chopped because it not only removes the bats’ habitat, but it could kill bats sleeping in the trees. If a tree is cut and bats are killed, ODNR can go after those in violation, Stankavich said.

“If someone cuts down a tree and harms these species, we could pursue restitution charges against that person. It’s kind of ‘cut at your own risk,’” she said.

Stankavich said 10 species of bats are found in Ohio.

Bird Netting Installation, Bat Exclusion Netting Installation, Bird Spike Installation And Bird Control Services For Ohio Businesses