In Ohio Call The Cottom's Wildlife Removal Company To Pickup A Deceased Pet, To Get Rid Of A Dead Deer In Your Yard Or To Remove A Dead Wild Animal From Your Property - Find Out How Much It Costs Here

In Ohio, Call The Cottom’s Wildlife Removal Company To Pickup A Deceased Pet, To Get Rid Of A Dead Deer In Your Yard Or To Remove A Dead Wild Animal From Your Property – Find Out How Much It Costs Here

Dead Deer Pick Up, Dead Wild Animal Disposal, Deceased Pet Removal And Odor Removal Services In Ohio – Costs From $399+

Cottom’s Wildlife Removal Company Is Who To Call To Find A Dead Animal In Your Walls, Pickup A Dead Deer On Your Property, To Dispose Of A Dead Wild Animal In Your Yard Or To Remove A Beloved Pet From Your House In Ohio – Call CWR To Find Out How Much It Costs

Numerous wildlife management situations in Ohio require the disposal of dead animals and wildlife carcasses. CWR is a highly rated wildlife control company that first finds, and then picks up and disposes of dead animals from yards, attics, basements and properties in Ohio. Animal carcasses must be disposed of properly, and legally, to protect Ohio’s environment (air and water quality), live stock farming and Ohio residents and their pets from disease.

CWR provides dead animal removal services to municipalities, business owners and homeowners in, and around, Cleveland, Columbus and Cincinnati and other towns in Ohio for a FEE. If you live in Ohio and want to request dead animal pick up services, and are prepared to pay for the service, call one of the phone numbers listed below.

Complete The Form Below To Contact Cottom’s Wildlife Removal and Environmental Services

CWR Removes & Picks Up Dead Animals In Ohio | Fees From $125+ | Dead Deer $395+ | Cleveland 440-236-8114 | Columbus 614-300-2763 | Cincinnati 513-808-9530 | For Homeowners & Businesses

CWR Removes And Picks Up Dead Animals In Ohio | Fees From $399+ | Dead Deer Removal Services From $895+ | Cleveland 440-236-8114 | Columbus 614-300-2763 | Cincinnati 513-808-9530 | For Homeowners And Businesses

Dead Animal Removal In Ohio

CWR Provides Dead Animal Removal Services For Homeowners And Businesses In Ohio For A FEE

Cottom’s Wildlife Removal (CWR) removes and picks up deer carcasses, deceased pets and dead animals in Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati, Toledo, Dayton, Springfield, Zanesville, Akron, Athens and other Ohio cities. Dead animal and nuisance wildlife carcass disposal rates start at $399. If you live in Ohio and want to get rid of a dead animal in your yard or on your property, call the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company.

CWR dead animal removal specialists use plastic body bags when disposing of dead animals in Ohio. Please note that CWR does not pick up and remove dead horses.

PICTURED HERE IS A DEAD DEER IN A BACKYARD IN OHIO - JUNE 10, 2021 - Who do you call to pick up a dead deer? The Cottom's Wildlife Removal (CWR) company removes and picks up deer carcasses and dead animals in Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati, Toledo, Dayton, Cleveland Heights, Akron, Marietta, Youngstown, Strongsville, Athens, Hamilton, Painesville, Canton, Springfield, Zanesville and other Ohio cities. Call CRW at 440-236-8114 in Cleveland/Northern Ohio, 614-300-2763 in Columbus/Central Ohio or 614-300-2763 in Cincinnati/Southern Ohio. How much does it cost to remove a dead deer in Ohio? Deer carcass removal and large animal removal costs start at $395.

PICTURED HERE IS A DEAD DEER IN A BACKYARD IN OHIO – JUNE 10, 2021 – Who do you call to pick up a dead deer and get rid of it? The Cottom’s Wildlife Removal (CWR) company removes and picks up deer carcasses and dead animals in Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati, Toledo, Dayton, Cleveland Heights, Akron, Marietta, Youngstown, Strongsville, Athens, Hamilton, Painesville, Canton, Springfield, Zanesville and other Ohio cities. Call CRW at 440-236-8114 in Cleveland/Northern Ohio, 614-300-2763 in Columbus/Central Ohio or 614-300-2763 in Cincinnati/Southern Ohio. How much does it cost to remove a dead deer in Ohio? Deer carcass removal and large animal removal costs start at $895. Prices to pick up and remove a small dead animal or bird from your yard or property in Ohio start at $399.

Ohio Division Of Natural Resources Wildlife District Offices

People should always avoid touching or handling sick or dead wild animals. Because Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease (EHD) affects some white-tailed deer, the Ohio Department Of Natural Resources suggests that Ohioans report sick or dead deer to the Division of Wildlife. Sightings of sick or dead deer should be reported your local Ohio wildlife officer or wildlife district office.

How Much Does It Cost To Remove A Dead Deer?

In states such as Ohio, the cost for a CWR deal animal removal professional to remove a dead deer on private property starts at $895. Total costs are based on the location and the complexity of the project.

Who Do You Call To Pick Up A Dead Raccoon? 

PICTURED HERE IS A DEAD RACCOON THAT WAS REMOVED FROM A YARD IN CLEVELAND, OHIO BY THE COTTOM'S WILDLIFE REMOVAL COMPANY - It is important to keep dead raccoons out of pools, houses, yards, basements and attics. Raccoon feces contains the eggs of a worm which can infect humans and cause severe neurologic illness. CWR is a professional wildlife removal company headquartered in Ohio that first finds, and then gets dead raccoons and deceased animals out of houses, walls and attics in Ohio. The animal control specialists at CWR get dead mice, dead snakes, birds, squirrels, deer, skunks, opossums and bats out of businesses, homes, apartments, sheds, outbuildings, garages, basements, backyards, vents, pools, chimneys, ductwork and from under decks and porches. If you are searching online for "dead animal removal near me", "how to get rid of a dead animal in your yard" or "dead animal removal cost" and you live in Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati or another city in Ohio call 440-236-8114 in Cleveland, 614-300-2763 in Columbus or 513-808-9530 in Cincinnati. When you contact CWR by phone, you can request a quote for animal carcass removal services and schedule a good time to have a dead animal located, picked up, taken away and disposed of. CWR dead animal removal experts also eliminate dead animal smells in houses and outside for Ohio residents. As domestic animal carcasses and pets decompose, bacteria is released that exposes people to disease causing pathogens. Owners of pets and domestic animals in Ohio are responsible for their disposal. The risk to humans from animal carcasses is low if proper precautions are taken. CWR's wild animal feces removal, bird dropping removal and bat guano removal services in Ohio start at $495.

PICTURED HERE IS A DEAD RACCOON THAT WAS REMOVED FROM A YARD IN CLEVELAND, OHIO BY THE COTTOM’S WILDLIFE REMOVAL COMPANY – It is important to keep dead raccoons out of pools, houses, yards, basements and attics. Raccoon feces contains the eggs of a worm which can infect humans and cause severe neurologic illness. CWR is a professional wildlife removal company headquartered in Ohio that first finds, and then gets dead raccoons and deceased animals out of houses, walls and attics in Ohio. The animal control specialists at CWR get dead mice, dead snakes, dead birds, dead squirrels, dead deer, dead skunks, dead groundhogs, dead opossums and dead bats out of businesses, homes, apartments, sheds, outbuildings, garages, basements, backyards, vents, pools, chimneys, ductwork and from under decks and porches. If you are searching online for “dead animal removal near me”, “how to get rid of a dead animal in your yard” or “dead animal removal cost” and you live in Ohio call 440-236-8114 in Cleveland, 614-300-2763 in Columbus or 513-808-9530 in Cincinnati. When you contact CWR by phone, you can request a quote for animal carcass removal services and schedule a good time to have a dead animal located, picked up, taken away and disposed of. CWR dead animal removal experts also eliminate dead animal smells inside and outside of houses for Ohio residents. As domestic animal carcasses and pets decompose, bacteria is released that exposes people to disease causing pathogens. Owners of pets and domestic animals in Ohio are responsible for their disposal. The risk to humans from animal carcasses is low if proper precautions are taken. CWR’s wild animal feces removal, bird dropping removal and bat guano removal services in Ohio start at $495. Prices to pick up and get rid of a small dead wild animal, bird or deceased pet from your yard, property or house in Ohio start at $399. Large animal and dead deer removal costs in Ohio start at $895.

Who Can Remove Dead Animals?

Dead animal removal experts that work at CWR include Mike Cottom Sr., Mike Cottom Jr., Kyle Fortune, Jason Neitenbach, Tyler Phillips, Alex Svensen and Nathan Lang. Mike Cottom Sr. has been removing dead animals since 1986 and has passed on his extensive knowledge to his son and coworkers.

In Ohio, call call CWR at 440-236-8114 in Cleveland, 614-300-2763 in Columbus or 513-808-9530 in Cincinnati to schedule a time for pick up with a local dead animal removal service near you. You can learn more about livestock and poultry carcass disposal options from the Ohio EPA, here.

White-tailed Deer
Posted On YouTube On March 1, 2021 By OhioDNR [OhioDNR.gov]

Beauty and Grace define Ohio’s official state mammal. You’ve probably seen a white-tailed deer, but you may not know how important they are to Ohio’s past. Deer program administrator Michael J. Tonkovich explains the role these creatures played in the state’s history.

How Much Does It Cost To Pick Up And Remove A Dead Deer, Wild Animal Or A Beloved Deceased Pet?

Deer carcass removal costs start at $895. Small animal removal costs start at $399. In Ohio, call CWR at 440-236-8114 in Cleveland, 614-300-2763 in Columbus or 513-808-9530 in Cincinnati to get a quote for CRW to pick up a dead deer, deceased pet or dead wild animal.

Prices to pick up and get rid of a dead wild animal, bird or deceased pet from your yard, property or house  in Ohio start at $399. Large animal and dead deer removal costs in Ohio start at $895.

How Do You Dispose Of A Dead Animal in Ohio?

If you live or work in Ohio and need to get rid of a dead animal, the easiest way to dispose of the dead animal is to contact the local wildlife management office of an animal removal service such as the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company.  Typical methods for the disposal of animal carcasses and animal mortalities in Ohio include rendering, burial, incineration and composting.

For more information on dead animal disposal in Ohio and the requirements for dead animal composting in Ohio, contact the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Soil and Water Conservation at (614) 265-6610 or the Ohio EPA, Division of Materials and Waste Management at (614) 644-2621.

Call 440-236-8114 in Cleveland/Northern Ohio, 614-300-2763 in Columbus/Central Ohio or 513-808-9530 in Cincinnati/Southern Ohio to schedule a convenient time to have the dead animal picked up and removed by the professional wildlife removal experts at CWR.

PICTURED HERE IS A DEAD ANIMAL AND DEER CARCASS REMOVAL SPECIALIST, TYLER PHILLIPS, AT WORK IN COLUMBUS, OHIO - JUNE 15, 2021 - Tyler Phillips, who works for the Cottom's Wildlife Removal company and he knows how to find dead animals in houses and roofs. Tyler is an expert at safely removing dead deer from yards and properties, dead mice from walls, dead bats and bird from roofs and dead raccoons from attics. When cities and municipalities in Ohio can not remove dead deer for their residents, the CWR wildlife management offices often get a phone call from a concerned citizen. CWR managers, Mike Cottom Sr. or Mike Cottom Jr. typically give the dead animal removal assignment to Mr. Phillips. He drives hundreds of miles every week with dead deer and wildlife carcasses in the back of a CWR deer removal truck on his way to a Class II Composting Facility. He always uses respiratory protection when taking away and disposing of animal carcasses. His favorite facepiece respirator is an N95 filtering facepiece respirator. He uses this respirator when he is exposed to dead animal carcasses, dead bats, dead skunks, dead raccoons, dead squirrels, dead fox (red and grey), dead domestic live stock, dead dogs, dead cats, dead livestock, dead birds and dead mice in buildings. Tyler is a stickler for safe work practices and animal handling procedures. He takes precautions to prevent being infected by rabies and other diseases associated with dead animals. Tyler wears puncture resistant and water proof medical grade nitrile gloves, waterproof boots and protective eyewear when he picks up and removes dead animal carcasses for Ohio homeowners and businesses. When blood or other bodily fluids are present, he wears a Tyvek® suit when disposing of animal carcasses to help ensure a safe environment.

PICTURED HERE IS A DEAD ANIMAL AND DEER CARCASS REMOVAL SPECIALIST, TYLER PHILLIPS, AT WORK IN COLUMBUS, OHIO – JUNE 15, 2021 – Tyler Phillips, works for the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company. This gentleman knows how to find dead animals in houses and roofs. Tyler is an expert at safely removing dead deer from yards and properties, dead mice from walls, dead bats and birds from roofs and dead raccoons from attics. When cities and municipalities in Ohio can not remove dead deer for their residents fast enough, the CWR wildlife management offices often get a phone call from a concerned citizen. CWR managers, Mike Cottom Sr. or Mike Cottom Jr. typically give the dead animal removal assignment to Mr. Phillips. He drives hundreds of miles every week with dead deer and wildlife carcasses in the back of a CWR animal removal truck on his way to drop off the load at a licensed solid waste landfill or a Class II Composting Facility (PDF). He always uses respiratory protection when taking away and disposing of animal carcasses. His favorite facepiece respirator is an N95 filtering facepiece respirator. He uses this respirator when he is exposed to dead animal carcasses, dead bats, dead skunks, dead raccoons, dead squirrels, dead fox (red and grey), dead domestic live stock, dead dogs, dead cats, dead rats and rodentsdead birds and dead mice in buildings. Tyler is a stickler for safe work practices and animal handling procedures. He takes precautions to prevent being infected by rabies and other diseases associated with dead animals. Tyler wears puncture resistant and water proof medical grade nitrile gloves, waterproof boots and protective eyewear when he picks up and removes dead animal carcasses for Ohio homeowners and businesses. When blood or other bodily fluids are present, he wears a Tyvek® suit (coveralls) when disposing of animal carcasses to help ensure a safe environment.

CWR gets rid of dead animals and takes away animal carcasses that are located in houses, attics, basements, garages and yards on private property in Cleveland, Dayton, Columbus, Toledo, Oxford, Plain City, Cincinnati, Mason, Mentor and West Chester, Ohio.

PICTURED HERE IS A DEAD ANIMAL REMOVAL TRUCK IN A HAMILTON, OHIO HOMEOWNERS DRIVEWAY - JUNE 15, 2021 - CWR wildlife removal experts use specialized trucks, professional animal handling equipment and their sense of smell to find and remove dead animals, mice, rodents, raccoons, rats, birds, bats, opossums from inside, and under, houses in Ohio. To have a dead animal removed from an attic, home, business or from a backyard in Ohio, call the Cottom's Wildlife Removal company at 440-236-8114 in Cleveland, 614-300-2763 in Columbus or 513-808-9530 in Cincinnati to schedule a good time to have the dead animal located and picked up. In Ohio, private animal control companies such as the Cottom's Wildlife Removal company, use specialized trucks, protective gear, personal protective equipment (PPE), winches and ATVs (All Terrain Vehicles) to remove large animals from fields, farms, driveways, lawns and yards in Wayne County, Avon, Mason, Burton, Findley, Blue Ash, Solon, Wadsworth, Munroe Falls, Brunswick, Hilliard and Sylvania, Ohio.

PICTURED HERE IS A DEAD ANIMAL REMOVAL TRUCK IN A HAMILTON, OHIO HOMEOWNER’S DRIVEWAY – JUNE 15, 2021 – CWR wildlife removal experts use specialized trucks, professional animal handling equipment and their sense of smell to find and remove dead animals, mice, rodents, raccoons, rats, birds, bats, opossums from inside, and under, houses in Ohio. To have a dead animal removed from an attic, home, business or a backyard in Ohio, call the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company at 440-236-8114 in Cleveland, 614-300-2763 in Columbus or 513-808-9530 in Cincinnati to schedule a good time to have the dead animal located and picked up. In Ohio, private animal control companies such as the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company, use protective gear, personal protective equipment (PPE), winches and ATVs (All Terrain Vehicles) to remove large animals from fields, farms, driveways, lawns and yards in Wayne County, Avon, Mason, Burton, Findley, Blue Ash, Solon, Wadsworth, Munroe Falls, Brunswick, Hilliard and Sylvania, Ohio.

CWR wildlife removal workers use animal handling gloves, polypropylene coveralls, respirators, filter masks, shovels, animal handling equipment and tongs to pick up and dispose of dead animals and wildlife carcasses that are found in Lorain, Ashtabula, Athens, Portsmouth, Lancaster, Mesopotamia and Maumee, Ohio.

Commercial nuisance wild animal operators and trappers, such as Cottom’s Wildlife Removal & Environmental Service, specialize in the removal of dead animals from homes, properties and businesses in Tipp City, Lakewood, Willoughby, Westlake, Brooklyn, Hamilton, Strongsville, Youngstown, Springfield and Zanesville, Ohio.

Ohio residents can also choose to drop off dead animals at local veterinarians, funeral homes and humane societies that accept dead animals and dead pets.

CWR is a professional wildlife control company that removes dead animals from attics, homes and walls in Tipp City, Lakewood, Willoughby, Westlake, Brooklyn, Hamilton, Strongsville, Youngstown, and Springfield, Ohio.

Because local animal control departments in Zanesville, Worthington, Grove City, Berea, Kettering and Akron, Ohio will not enter a home, yard or property to remove a dead animal, CWR is who you call to dispose of a dead animal.

Because dead animals and dead wildlife produce a terrible odor, residents of Westerville, Marysville, Upper Arlington, Dublin, and Lima, Ohio call CWR to request that dead squirrels, deer, dogs, opossums, skunks, coyotes, mice, raccoons and stray cats be removed as quickly as possible.

In Ohio, four common methods to dispose of a dead animal are burying, incineration, composting and rendering. Incineration is the best method to use if the animal is diseased.

If you live in Grove City, Brook Park, Westerville, Troy, Shaker Heights or Middleburg Heights, Ohio and find or smell an animal carcass in your backyard, RV, walls, tool shed, car, under your floorboards, in your crawl space, under your porch, or in another location call CWR to request a quote for animal removal services.

To stop the spread of parasitic diseases, zoonotic diseases, infectious diseases, aerobic bacterium (Francisella tularensis) and viruses, Ohio residents that live in Avon Lake, New Concord, Bellbrook, Madison, Independence, and Concord typically contact CWR right away to safely dispose of dead animals. The Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company and the Zoonotic Disease Program (ZDP) of the Ohio Department of Health both work to prevent and control diseases transmissible from animals to humans.

When natural disasters happen (floods) in Mansfield, Beavercreek, Cuyahoga Falls, North Ridgeville, Sandusky, Elyria and Hudson, Ohio, CWR wildlife removal professionals quickly dispose of animal carcasses to minimize the health risks in these communities.

Diseases such as anthrax and leptospirosis can be acquired indirectly by humans through ingestion, inhalation or contact with infected animal products, soil, water or other environmental surfaces that have been contaminated with animal waste or a dead animal. People in Ohio should always avoid touching or handling sick or dead wild animals.

Ulceroglandular tularemia can result from handling a dead animal, so do not touch a dead animal in your yard or house. The ocular form of tularemia can happen when you rub your eyes after touching a dead animal that has been infected. Inhaling the bacteria can lead to pneumonic tularemia.

People that live and work in Parma, Parma Heights, Cleveland Heights, University Heights, Stow, Wooster, Warren and Westlake should contact the wildlife control experts at CWR to take away dead animals to eliminate the potential dangers and plagues caused by pest and flea infestations.

According to the Ohio EPA, municipalities take dead animals to licensed solid waste landfills or composting facilities authorized to accept animal carcasses. Please contact the facility operator for disposal policies. In Ohio, municipal divisions and county departments, such as the Columbus Division of Refuse Collection and the Franklin County Department of Highway Maintenance collect dead animals in the public right-of-way and on county roads, city streets, sidewalks and highways.

Animal carcasses that are removed by the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company in Greene County, Middleton, Maple Heights, Marietta, Twinsburg and North Royalton, Ohio must be safely handled with care to prevent exposure to serious diseases, like rabies, that may be carried by the animals.

CWR animal removal experts always wear gloves and follow the proper protocols for the safe handling and disposal of carcasses when they are hired to get rid of dead wildlife by residents of Powell, Canton, Broadview Heights, Rocky River, Bay Village and Bedford, Ohio.

Who Do I Call To Pick Up A Dead Dog, Deceased Cat Or Pet In Ohio? Compassionate CWR pet removal professionals provide deceased pet pick up services to Ohio residents that do not want to bury their beloved dog, cat, snake or bird. In Ohio, call CWR at 440-236-8114 in Cleveland, 614-300-2763 in Columbus or 513-808-9530 in Cincinnati to schedule a time for a sensitive CWR domestic animal removal specialist to stop by your place. You can also call your local animal control office or a local veterinarian to see if they can arrange for the disposal or cremation of your beloved companion. Another option is to have your pet cremated and the ashes returned to you. It is legal to bury your pet in your own yard. Some pet owners in Ohio choose to have their pet laid to rest in one of multiple pet cemeteries located throughout the state. However, this option is somewhat expensive.

Who Do I Call To Pick Up A Dead Dog, Deceased Cat Or Pet In Ohio? Compassionate CWR pet removal professionals provide deceased pet pick up services to Ohio residents that do not want to bury their beloved dog, cat, snake or bird. In Ohio, call CWR at 440-236-8114 in Cleveland, 614-300-2763 in Columbus or 513-808-9530 in Cincinnati to schedule a time for a sensitive CWR domestic animal removal specialist to stop by your place. You can also call your local animal control office or a local veterinarian to see if they can arrange for the disposal or cremation of your beloved companion. Another option is to have your cherished pet cremated and the ashes returned to you. In Ohio, it is legal to bury your treasured pet in your own backyard. Some pet owners in Ohio choose to have their adored pet laid to rest in one of multiple pet cemeteries located throughout the state. However, this option is somewhat expensive.

What Do You Do With A Dead Deer In Ohio?

You can call the ODNR Customer Service Center at 1-800-WILDLIFE \ (800) 945-3543, request CWR’s dead dear removal services (FEE REQUIRED) or contact your local community’s public works department.

Where Do You Put A Dead Dog?

You can call CWR to remove a dead dog, you can bury the dog in your backyard or you can call your local veterinarian to help handle the burial or cremation. The State of Ohio does have state laws that pet owners are encouraged to follow. Landfills in Ohio are supposed to accept the bodies of pets. Laws in the State of Ohio permit pet owners to bury their pet dogs under 2 feet of soil, as long as the dog is not buried beneath the water table; cremate them and properly dispose of the ashes, or take them to a landfill.

What To Do If You Find A Dead Raccoon In Your Yard?

The City Of Dublin, Ohio suggests that if you see a deceased raccoon in your yard, you may double bag the animal and place in your regular Rumpke bin. To bag a deceased small animal, wear gloves, place the first bag over the animal and wrap it around (you do not need to touch the animal) to roll it in the bag. Tie the bag and place that bag into a second bag. This prevents germs from spreading and controls odor. The city of Dublin, Ohio will pick up deceased wildlife on City property, streets and curbside. If you need assistance with a deceased animal, contact them at 614-410-4730.

It is not safe to pick up a dead raccoon on your property or inside your home with your bare hands because raccoons can carry pathogens that cause diseases.

Learn more about the disposal of dead raccoons in Ohio, here.

How Much Does It Cost To Remove A Dead Animal From The Wall?

Removing a dead animal from inside the wall is not easy for homeowners. Luckily for Ohioans, there is an affordable alternative to do-it-yourself animal removal. In Ohio, the first step to remove a dead animal from the wall is to call the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company at 440-236-8114 in Cleveland, 614-300-2763 in Columbus or 513-808-9530 in Cincinnati to schedule an inspection of the wall in your house or building. Inspection costs start at $399 in Ohio. The inspection fee will be applied to the total cost to cut through the wall, remove the dead animal from inside the wall and to patch the drywall. A written quote to remove a dead animal from the wall will be provided after the inspection has been completed.

What Type Of Dead Animals Does The Cottom’s Wildlife Removal Company Take Away In Ohio?

Wild animal carcasses, dead domestic animals and deceased pets that the compassionate CWR animal management experts pick up and remove in Ohio include white-tailed deer, dog, nuisance animal, cat, raccoon, bird, coyote, wolf, fox, snake, opossum, llama, bobcat, lizard, groundhog, large mammal, squirrel (red, gray, black, fox), reptile, feral swine (wild boar), skunk, pig and weasel.

Caring CWR wildlife control specialists in Ohio also pick up and get rid of other dead animal remains such as Little brown bat, wild animals, hawk, Big brown bat, goose, owl, pigeon, small mammal, raptor, buzzard, rabbit and sheep.

Sensitive CWR animal removal professionals in Ohio also dispose of goat, ferret, chicken, parrot, turkey, duck, eagle, turkey vulture, osprey, gull, crow, ring-necked pheasant, muskrat, blue heron, falcon, python, monitor lizard, boa constrictor, beaver, iguana, mink, otter, ruffed grouse, anaconda, black vulture, guinea pig, rat, quail, macaw, cockatoo and other types of wildlife, fauna, four-legged friends and deceased domestic animals.

CWR DOES NOT pick up dead horses, dead donkeys, dead cattle, dead bears or dead cows. CWR DOES NOT pick up dead animals on the side of the road in Ohio. CWR DOES NOT cleanup road kill and DOES NOT pick up dead animals from the street in Ohio.

Can You Call Someone To Pick Up A Dead Dog?

In Ohio call CWR at 440-236-8114 in Cleveland, 614-300-2763 in Columbus or 513-808-9530 in Cincinnati to get a quote for CRW to pick up a dead dog on private property. Costs to pick up a dead dog start at $399.

What Do You Do If You Find A Dead Deer In Your Yard?

Call The Cottom's Wildlife Removal Company To Remove a Dead Deer From Your Property

Call The Cottom’s Wildlife Removal Company To Remove a Dead Deer From Your Property

It is recommended that the professionals at Cottom’s Wildlife Removal remove dead deer from homeowner’s yards and businesses in Ohio. Deer carcasses are usually very heavy, they stink and they may often be torn apart. Dead deer attract coyotes and other predators. Deer in Ohio may be contaminated with an infectious disease such as Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). Do not touch or handle a dead deer.

Dead Deer and Deer Carcass Removal Services in Cleveland and Northeastern, Ohio

Cottom’s Wildlife Removal (CWR) removes and picks up deer carcasses and dead animals in Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati, Akron and other Ohio cities. Prices start at $399 to take away small animals. Deer carcass removal and large animal removal costs start at $895. CWR deer carcass removal services begin with a phone call to 440-236-8114 in Cleveland, 614-300-2763 in Columbus or 513-808-9530 in Cincinnati. Call us and we will schedule a convenient time to perform the service.

Prices to remove a deer carcass, or other large dead animal, in Northern Ohio start at $895. Costs are dependent upon the location of the dead deer or large animal and the complexity of the dead animal removal project. We usually schedule service within 1-2 days.

If you need to have a deer carcass or dead animal removed from your yard, business or community, please call CWR for more information and/or to schedule a service call to your business, residence or location.

Our company also performs ‘off road’ deer carcass removal services for cities, municipalities and animal control departments in Ohio.

Dead Animal Removal In Worthington, Ohio

If a dead animal is in the City right-of-way such as a street, City service crews can remove and dispose of the animal. The Worthington Department of Service & Engineering can be called Monday-Friday between 7:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. at (614) 431-2425.

If the dead animal is on private property (in your driveway, sidewalk, yard or home) you must perform the dead animal removal yourself or contact a private company that disposes of dead animals, such as the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company. You can also find a county-by-county list of commercial nuisance wild animal control operators on the Ohio Department of Natural Resources website, here.

Dead Animal Removal In Columbus and Franklin County, Ohio

The Franklin County Dog Shelter & Adoption Center suggests that Columbus residents that need a dead animal removed, call the Division of Refuse at 614-645-3111. For dead animal removal on Ohio’s interstate highways, call the Ohio Department of Transportation at 614-799-9237. For all other areas of Franklin County, call your local municipal or township trustee office.

Dead Animal Collection In Columbus And Franklin County, Ohio

You may arrange to drop-off a dead animal by calling the Capital Area Humane Society/Columbus Humane (614) 777-7387, extension 208. For the collection of dead animals on county roads or highways, contact the Franklin County Department of Highway Maintenance at (614) 462-3072.

SECOND POSITIVE CWD TISSUE SAMPLE IDENTIFIED IN WILD OHIO DEER

MARCH 5, 2021 – COLUMBUS, Ohio – The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) Division of Wildlife has identified a second positive test for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in a wild white-tailed deer in Wyandot County. The mature doe was harvested in January during a controlled hunt on the Killdeer Plains Wildlife Area refuge, within 2 miles of the first positive location. Read more here.

What To Do If You Hit A Deer With Your Car In Ohio
October 4, 2020

The American Automobile Association, which was founded in 1902 in Chicago, Illinois, provides some great advice on what to do if you hit a deer on the roads in Ohio.

The white-tailed deer is a typical sight in Ohio through much of the year. But when you’re driving, you may wish it wasn’t so common. According to the Highway Loss Data Institute, the number of insurance claims due to animal-vehicle collisions peaks each November.

How to Hit A Deer Safely

When a collision is imminent, you should know the proper way to hit a deer to keep yourself safe.

“Being from the country, you have to be on high alert when you’re driving,” said Chelsea Creque, Franklin County, Ohio resident. “There have been a lot of times I’ve had to slam on the brakes, and I’ve had some family members who totaled their cars by hitting deer.”

  • Don’t swerve. By far, one of the biggest mistakes you can make right before you hit a deer is swerving. Swerving can seem correct in the moment, but this can cause you to hit another vehicle or someone’s property. This situation now changes your collision’s entire nature and can also seriously injure yourself or another driver.
  • Don’t speed up. Contrary to popular belief, speeding up before hitting a deer will not do you any favors. It can cause more damage to you and your vehicle.
  • Apply the brakes. Hold onto your steering wheel, apply the brakes, and try your best to come to a complete stop as soon as you can. Braking is the safest way to hit a deer and will cause significantly less damage than the alternative.

What Are The First Steps After Hitting A Deer With A Car

  • Move off the road. Moving off the road keeps other drivers and yourself safe. Turn your hazard lights on and move out of traffic. If your vehicle is inoperable, still try your best to get it in a safe spot.
  • Report if deer is in road. Reporting the accident can help on many fronts, but especially is the injured deer is still in the roadway.
  • Let proper authorities handle the deer. Reporting the accident can help on many fronts, but especially if the injured deer is still in the roadway.
  • Assess damage to vehicle. If you’re going to make a claim, you may want to snap a few pictures of the vehicle damage. It will help you and your insurance provider when processing the claim.
  • Don’t automatically assume your car is ok to drive! Once you’ve taken all the necessary steps after hitting a deer, you’ll be ready to move on with your life. Don’t assume your car to drive. It may need to be towed. AAA members can have their vehicle towed after the incident, and depending on the level of membership, not be charged a thing! Check out the different AAA membership levels and how they can benefit you.

Is It Illegal To Hit A Deer And Drive Off?

In short—no. Keep in mind this is only true if you only hit a deer. If you swerve and damage another vehicle or property, then yes. You’ll need to contact your insurance company, local police, etc. like you would with any other accident.

If this isn’t the case, it’s totally up to the driver’s discretion, but most states ask you to notify authorities if the deer is badly injured. It can be a potential hazard to anyone near it and needs to be handled as soon as possible.

Another factor that will warrant a call to local authorities will be if someone in the vehicle is injured.

Are You Supposed to Report Hitting a Deer?

  • Aside from the exceptions mentioned above, you are not legally obligated to report to police or call your insurance company. This is a “your prerogative” type situation, but here are some reasons you may want to consider reporting the auto-deer collision.
  • Police will help walk you through the situation step-by-step. While blogs like these can help prepare you for a less than ideal situation, the police will be able to help guide you through the process and ensure you’re taking proper safety measures. Calling the police will help with your insurance claim if you file one. An official police report can help aid you when speaking with your insurance company.
  • Consider your insurance claim. Unless the damage is minimal or you plan to pay out of pocket, you’re going to want to notify your insurance company immediately. The sooner you inform them, the sooner your insurance company can process your claim.

Still not convinced? In a recent press release, it was reported that “In 2018, the average insurance claim for a deer-vehicle collision in Ohio was nearly $4,000. Vehicle sensors found on newer vehicles continue to increase repair costs. In fact, AAA found these new safety systems can double repair bills for minor collisions.”

Hitting a Deer and Your Insurance

If you want to be proactive about precautions to take in case you hit a deer, start with your insurance. You need to know the difference between comprehensive and collision coverage.

  • Comprehensive insurance – Comprehensive covers an array of situations, but most importantly, it can cover animal collisions for this situation. Remember, this coverage applies if you only hit the animal.
  • Collision insurance – Collision covers the cost of damages as a result of an accident. Such situations like hit-and-runs, an accident caused by other motorists, or you swerving to avoid an animal and hitting another vehicle or property will be covered under this type of insurance.

To check up on your policy, call a AAA insurance agent at (888) 222-6446, or visit AAA.com/Insurance

Ways to Avoid Hitting a Deer With A Car

Fortunately, you can take steps to keep yourself deer-free on the roads. Remaining diligent is a significant game-changer. Spotting a deer before it’s too late is the best way to avoid an auto-deer collision. Here are some tips from a current AAA Ohio Auto Club press release to keep you safe on the road:

  • Scan the road – Look ahead while driving! This may seem like an obvious one, but too often, we get caught up in our driving distractions. We may lose focus on what’s ahead. If you can spot a deer (or any other animal) ahead of time, it will give you time to react appropriately.
  • Use high beam headlights – This will aid in spotting a deer ahead of time. High beams help spot animals’ reflective eyes and increase your overall field of vision.
  • Be cautious at dawn and dusk – Dusk and dawn are peak times for deer-related auto-accidents. Knowing when deer are most active can help prevent you from hitting a deer with a car.
  • Always wear your seatbelt – According to the Insurance Information Institute, the chances of getting injured when hitting an animal are much higher if you don’t have on your seatbelt.

Gary Comer, the wildlife management supervisor for central Ohio’s Division of Natural Resources, also advises people to be aware of their surroundings.

“Pay attention to deer crossing signs – they pop up because people have hit deer there,” said Comer. “And rural areas aren’t the only places you need to be aware. Large urban areas can also be home to deer.”

You also want to pay attention to the time of year. Deer tend to be moving and more active during fall time. We urge that you be cautious all year round, but knowing the trends of animals that can do some major damage to you or your vehicle can help you prevent a major accident.

Need auto protection? Learn about the auto insurance discounts available to AAA members.

Ohio DNR Division of Wildlife
Posted To YouTube On September 5, 2019 By OhioDNR [OhioDNR.gov]

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Wildlife is building upon its legacy of fish and wildlife conservation, habitat, and providing recreational opportunities for all Ohioans.

Mentor Deer Management Program Success
Posted To YouTube On October 13, 2017 By The City Of Mentor, Ohio

Take a stroll today through the forest at the Mentor Lagoons Nature Preserve and you’ll see plants and animals that you wouldn’t have found five years ago.

By 2013, the biodiversity of the Lagoons was severely compromised due to overpopulation of white-tail deer. Lacking natural predators, the every-growing herd devastated saplings, wildflowers, and other understory plants. Due to the lack of food, the deer were underweight and disease prone. Birds and other forest animals were also affected since they relied on the same plants as a food source and habitat.

It’s evident that deer management requires sensitivity to maintain balance, but results are evident and encouraging. We look forward to the recovery of the natural habitat in the City.

How May Roadkill And Other Dead Animals Be Disposed Of By Municipalities In Ohio?
Published By the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency On May 9, 2011 [Updated April 4 2019]

Municipalities may be required to handle animal carcasses resulting from routine services including removal of roadkill and disposition of euthanized animals. Generally, dead animals may be either taken to a licensed solid waste landfill or composting facility authorized to accept animal carcasses. Please contact the facility operator for disposal policies.

Roadkill Best Management Practices

The practice of removing animal carcasses from roadways is essential to public safety. As a safety measure, it is acceptable for road crews to merely remove an animal carcass from the roadway and placing the dead animal in an adjacent public right-of-way. The carcass should not be placed in a ditch or in a manner that contributes to pollution of waterways and should not be placed near animal grazing areas.

General Animal Disposal

In cases when a road crew collects dead animals or a dog warden manages euthanized animals, then the municipality has taken on responsibility for the proper disposition of the animal carcasses. As previously mentioned, dead animals may be either taken to a licensed landfill or composting facility authorized to accept animal carcasses. Onsite burial would be considered open dumping or operating an illegal landfill. If a municipality is interested in establishing a composting facility for the purpose of managing dead animals, please refer to the fact sheet titled Composting Animal Carcasses at Class II Composting Facilities.

For more information on the management and disposition of animal carcasses, please contact the Division of Materials and Waste Management by telephone at (614) 644-2621.

Licensed Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Facilities Which Accept Animal Carcasses [PDF]
Ohio EPA Division of Materials & Waste Management
12/15/2014

Ohio Registered Compost Facilities 2019 | Search By County, Facility Name, Class, Address, Registration Number, Secondary Id And Phone [PDF]

Composting Animal Carcasses at Class II | Composting Facilities | PDF | Ohio Environmental Agency

What are Class II composting facilities?
In Ohio, Class II solid waste composting facilities accept only source-separated yard waste, animal wastes, agricultural wastes, food scraps, authorized bulking agents, additives, and other alternative materials, such as animal carcasses. Alternative materials require approval by the director of Ohio EPA.

Which animals can be composted at Class II composting facilities?
Most farm animals such as chickens, swine, cattle and horses can be composted at Class II facilities. However, Ohio law requires that animals to be composted are free of certain infectious diseases.

How do I start?
To register with Ohio EPA as a Class II facility, you need to complete a registration application form, including a plan view drawing of the facility. There is no cost involved in the registration. You can obtain an application form and assistance completing the form by contacting your Ohio EPA district office, or the solid waste compliance and inspection support unit at Ohio EPA’s Central Office.

How do I obtain a license?
Class II composting facilities are required to obtain a license from an approved local health district. Please contact your local health district to request a solid waste composting facility license application form. If your local health district is not approved, then licensing is done through Ohio EPA. Contact your Ohio EPA district office, or the solid waste compliance and inspection support unit at Ohio EPA’s Central Office. An application for a license must be received by the approved Health District or Ohio EPA at least 90 days prior to opening and/or accepting any wastes at the facility. The cost of the license will depend on the requested authorized maximum daily waste receipts (AMDWR) to be accepted at the facility. Please see the license fee table at right for license fee. A $100.00 license application fee is applied toward the total license fee. Licenses are renewed annually.

What is financial assurance and how do I complete this requirement?
Financial assurance is a standard of financial responsibility established to assure that funds will be available for proper closure of a facility. The amount of financial assurance for a Class II composting facility is based on the volume of material, which includes the feedstock, curing compost, cured compost and bulking agents. There are six financial assurance mechanisms that comply with this requirement; the mechanisms are listed in Ohio Administrative Code (OAC) Rule 3745-503-05. The actual wording to be used for these mechanisms is listed in OAC Rule 3745-503-20. The financial assurance mechanism is required to be submitted with the Class II registration and funded within 90 days of submitting the facility’s registration to Ohio EPA. For more information on financial assurance, please contact the financial assurance and remediation unit at Ohio EPA Central Office, (614) 644-2621.

How do I get an approval to compost dead animals?
You must submit a proposal describing the kind of animal(s) you want to compost, the source of the carcasses and amount to be accepted, composting method, and projected use for the compost product. The solid waste compliance and inspection support unit at Ohio EPA’s Central Office can provide you with samples of proposals and assist you in preparing your proposal.

What is in an approval?
The approval letter specifies operating procedures, methodology of composting, feedstocks (kind of animals), bulking agents, testing requirements for the compost product, and contingency planning in the event problems occur (i.e. equipment failure, inclement weather, fire, storage problems).

What can I do with the compost?
Cured compost that meets the testing requirements of the approval letter can be sold, given away, or land applied.

What are the testing requirements for the compost?
Cured compost produced from animal carcasses must be tested, at a minimum, for metals, pathogens, foreign matter, maturity, pH, salinity, total organic carbon, and total nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK). Additional tests may be required, if there are special concerns with the animal carcasses or with the bulking agents utilized.

I am already the owner and/or operator of a Class II composting facility. What do
I need to do?
You only need to submit a proposal to compost animal carcasses, as explained above. Please be aware that your license cost and the financial assurance fund may change, based on the new AMDWR.

Is Ohio EPA the only agency that regulates dead animal composting?
No, both the Ohio EPA Division of Materials and Waste Management (DMWM) and the ODNR Division of Soil and Water Conservation have been directed by the legislature to address dead animal composting.

When is composting of animal carcasses regulated by ODNR?
ODNR regulates composting of animal carcasses at agricultural operations when either of the following
applies:

1. The composting is conducted by the person who raises the animals and the compost product is used in agricultural operations owned or operated by that person; or

2. The composting is conducted by the person who owns the animals, but does not raise them, and the compost product is used in agricultural operations either by a person who raises the animals or by a person who raises grain that is used to feed them.

Ohio EPA’s testing requirements are applicable if the compost is distributed for use outside the agricultural operation.

More Sources of Information Regarding Composting Animal Carcasses at Class
II Composting Facilities

1. Visit epa.ohio.gov/dmwm

2. Contact your local health department.

3. Contact the Ohio EPA District Offices – DMWM inspectors.
Ohio EPA District Offices:
Central District Office: (614) 728-3778
Northeast District Office: (330) 963-1200
Northwest District Office: (419) 352-8461
Southeast District Office: (740) 385-8501
Southwest District Office: (937) 285-6357

4. Contact Ohio EPA Central Office’s Solid Waste Compliance and Inspection Support Unit at (614) 644-2621

5. For information about training for composting of swine, poultry and livestock mortalities, please contact your local OSU-Extension office.

A Disposal Option for Dead Animals In Ohio

To find out about the requirements for dead animal composting in Ohio, contact the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Soil and Water Conservation at (614) 265-6610 or Ohio EPA, Division of Solid and Infectious Waste Management at (614) 644-2621.

Wildlife Carcass Disposal Methods [PDF From The U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service Wildlife Services]
July 2018

For many years, carcasses were disposed of through various types of burial or by rendering. Rendering is a process that converts waste animal tissues and other parts into edible and inedible products. Awareness of prion-based diseases, such as chronic wasting disease (CWD) and Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy, have raised concerns regarding the continued use of these traditional methods of disposal. Be sure to check state regulations regarding the transport of carcasses across county and state jurisdictions particularly in areas where prion-based diseases are a concern.
Threats to groundwater from burial practices, especially in areas with shallow water tables, along with allegations of declining air quality and public health risks from incinerator emissions, have led to new procedures and alternative methods whenever possible.

Current disposal methods include the following:

  • Aboveground burial (surface disposal),
  • composting,
  • belowground,
  • incineration,
  • disposal in a licensed landfill, and
  • other disposal options.

Read more about wildlife carcass disposal methods here (PDF).

Verify: Who is responsible for removing animal carcasses from the interstate?
Published On June 12, 2017 By WKYC

Thousands of people travel Ohio Interstates every day. No one likes to catch a glimpse of a dead animal on the side of the road, but it can be a daily occurrence on local interstates. Sometimes it seems, no one’s cleaning it up.

So we wanted to VERIFY: Who’s responsible for removing animal carcasses from the interstate? O-DOT is responsible for addressing dead animals on Ohio interstates.

We talked with Amanda McFarland. She’s the spokesperson for O-DOT District 12. She tells us, crews do not completely remove the carcass from the scene.

“There is not a spot set aside for us to be able to remove the deer completely from the highway in any one certain spot,” she said.

Rather, the main objective is to move the carcass from drivers’ line of sight. They do this by moving it to a nearby grassy or wooded area, where nature takes its course.

If needed, crews will apply wood chips or lye powder to minimize foul odor. O-DOT crews will get there faster if the carcass is a safety hazard.

“If it’s blocking a lane of traffic we will get to it as soon as possible,” said McFarland.

But it may take longer if the animal’s on the berm. McFarland says O-DOT’s goal is to remove all dead animals in a reasonable amount of time.

McFarland says O-DOT gets several reports every week about dead animals on the road. You can make a report by calling (216) 581-2100.

This report is VERIFIED. The Ohio Department of Transportation is responsible for removing animal carcasses from the interstate.

If you have a question you want verified tweet us @WKYC.

Reporting a Deer Carcass on a Roadway or Right-of-Way In Hudson, Ohio

To report a dead deer in the roadway, or on the right-of-way on the side of the road, please call Hudson Public Works at (330) 342-1750 between the hours of 8 am and 4:30 pm, Monday through Friday, or submit a work request through our online Request Tracker.

Meet Danny Jackson, The Man Who Cleans Up Roadkill From Cincinnati Streets
Byron McCauley, Cincinnati Enquirer
Published June 20, 2019

Anyone who thinks Americans would rather foist their dirtiest, nastiest jobs onto someone more willing to do them obviously has not met Danny Jackson of Cincinnati. I have always had a special place in my heart for workers like strawberry pickers, roofers, farmers, plumbers and the folks who haul off our garbage every week. Jackson is on a whole other level. He’s the guy whose sole job is to remove dead animals from our city streets as part of the sanitation division of the Public Services Department. He drives more than 250 miles a week, often with a truck bed filled with animal carcasses. People may remember seeing him in a 2011 episode of “Undercover Boss” with former Mayor Mark Mallory.

‘I know how to get it’
Jackson is 63 years old but looks 20 years younger. He grew up in the Skyline Acres neighborhood near Colerain Township. He has been on this job for 10 years now. Nothing grosses him out.”I stopped being grossed out when I started getting hungry and thirsty. I had to eat. And this was the job that was available,” Jackson said. “You got child support looking at you in the face. And after so long it just became natural to me. To pick up a deer or a raccoon or a skunk, it’s natural. I know how to get it.” He told me he could eat a sandwich in the truck. He is joking. (I think.)

Read more here.

ODNR Division of Wildlife Tests An Ohio Deer For Chronic Wasting Disease
Uploaded To YouTube On January 6, 2015 By Farm and Dairy [FarmAndDairy.com]

Proper Procedure Required To Claim Deer Killed On The Road
Published By The Blade On February 17, 2004

When it comes to road-killed deer, if you hit it, you own it.

If you want it.

The foregoing may not exactly sound appetizing, or even desirable. But some motorists may not know that it is legal to claim road-killed deer, and that minimally damaged, fresh kills can yield a fair amount of edible venison.

In both Ohio and Michigan the driver has first claim to a carcass, but anyone may do so if the driver involved in a deer collision leaves the scene or otherwise waives his claim.

It is important to note that wildlife lawmen, not to mention local judges, however, may take a dim view of someone taking possession of a roadkill without a permit.

Kevin Newsome, state wildlife officer assigned to Lucas County, said that law enforcement agencies – state troopers, sheriff s deputies, municipal police, and metropark rangers – generally all have deer-carcass receipts. Lawmen will issue such a receipt to a driver at a vehicle-deer accident, or to anyone the driver designates at the scene.

If no one is at the scene of a road-killed deer, anyone may claim the carcass, provided that a receipt is issued. Contact a nearby law enforcement agency or state wildlife officer if the scene is unattended. Moving the carcass without a receipt could result in a ticket for illegal possession of a deer.

In some areas, Newsome added, law enforcement agencies keep lists of local residents and charitable institutions willing to collect unclaimed roadkills. Contact your local police or sheriff s department or patrol post about being included on such a list.

Rod Clute, big-game specialist for the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, said that motorists in Michigan may claim both deer or black bear carcasses. But a claim permit must be issued by a law enforcement agency or a state conservation officer, as in Ohio.

Similarly, anyone can claim an unattended carcass in Michigan by contacting a law enforcement agency for a permit.

City Of Cincinnati – Neighborhood Operations Division

The Neighborhood Operations Division touches the lives of citizens every day by managing solid waste collection, green space management and special neighborhood maintenance programs, such as Keep Cincinnati Beautiful.

The Neighborhood Operations Division provides quality community-driven service to the citizens of Cincinnati through neighborhood programs including solid waste collection, special collection, recycling, street cleaning, green space management, neighborhood improvement programs, and community clean up services.

Their services include dead animal removal.

Animal Control In The City Of Westlake, Ohio

Responsibilities
The Westlake Animal Control Officer manages all issues related to animals, from public education regarding ordinances and laws, to citizen complaints about invasive animals. The Animal Control Officer patrols the city, enforces such laws, and provides solutions to animal-related issues to make Westlake a safe place for residents and animals, too.

Services
Animal control services include:

  • Consulting on wildlife conflicts
  • Coordinating adoption of homeless animals
  • Managing the City’s kennel
  • Notifying owners of found pets
  • Picking up animals at large
  • Tending to injured, sick and trapped wildlife

Deer
Living with an urban deer population can be a challenge to residents, visitors and travelers in any Northeast Ohio suburb, including Westlake. The City of Westlake has a City Deer Management Program.

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources’ (ODNR) website has suggestions on dealing with various species of animals, including deer.

Our Dealing with Deer Issues in Westlake Ohio Guidelines (PDF) draw from the ODNR information and also provide specifics on what techniques are permitted within the city, including:

  • Garden Damage
  • Landscape Damage
  • Tree Rubbing Damage
  • Deer Vehicle Accidents
  • Aggressiveness
  • Do I have an Orphaned Fawn?

As a reminder:
Hunting animals within the City of Westlake by anyone other than law enforcement is prohibited. Westlake Ordinance 505.11

Feeding deer is prohibited by Westlake Ordinance 505.22.

Adopt/Find a Pet
For assistance in finding a lost dog or adopting an animal, call Jim Wang at 440-892-3150 or visit the Cuyahoga County Kennel.

Deer Management In The City Of Beachwood, Ohio

Deer Management

The City of Beachwood and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Wildlife are working together to address issues pertaining to deer in our community.

  • Here Are Some Facts:
    Deer look for easy sources of food. To protect your garden, the Division of Wildlife suggests that you install a 3-4 foot barrier (vinyl, hardware cloth, etc.) with the first foot of the barrier underground to keep small critters out like raccoons, skunks, and groundhogs. On the corners of the garden install posts that reach seven feet off the ground. Then run a single wire around the garden 7 feet off the ground. Periodically hang ribbon (or better yet aluminum pie pans to scare off the birds) to act as a visual deterrent to the deer. Deer have bad depth perception and they will not jump between the hard fence and the top wire.
  • Various sprays deter deer from eating plants. Cayenne pepper can also be used by spraying plants with water and then generously dusting them with the pepper. The hotter you make the plant the less likely the deer will eat it.
  • Choose plants that tend to be less palatable. Keep in mind that if a deer is hungry enough, there is no plant that it “will never eat.”

For additional information visit the Ohio Division of Wildlife website.

If the techniques mentioned above are not working, contact the Division of Wildlife at 330-644-2293. Often times they can identify the reason over the phone as to why the technique is not working and can give site-specific advice to further help alleviate the deer problems on your property.

Animal Control And Dead Animal Pickup In The City Of Westerville, Ohio

Animals – Animal Control – The City may arrange for trapping and removal of feral cats or wild animals that present a threat to public health, safety or welfare. For more information, call 614-901-6450.

Animals– Dead on Roadside – City crews will pick up dead animals from City roadways. For assistance, call the Westerville Public Service Department at 614-901-6740.

Dead Animal Removal From The Roads In Athens, Ohio

There is a dead animal in a city roadway. What should I do?
Notify the Department of Public Works and someone will come to take away the animal.
Address: 30 Curran Drive, Athens, OH 45701
Email: epwsupport@ci.athens.oh.us
Phone: 740-593-7636

Dead Animal Removal In The City Of Youngstown, Ohio

Public Works
The Public Works Department oversees various Divisions that deal with City infrastructure and public services. The Department also operates the City’s residential garbage collection program.

The City will remove dead animals on City streets or at the curb. Dead animals on private property are the responsibility of the property owner. To request the removal of a dead animal, use the Online Dead Animal Report Form (see below) or contact the Public Works Department:

Report Dead Animal – ONLINE – SeeClickFix

Public Works Department
City Hall, 5th Floor
26 South Phelps Street
Youngstown, OH 44503
Map
Office Phone: (330) 742-8800
Fax: (330) 742-8807
Email: cshasho@youngstownohio.gov

Dead Animal Removal In The City Of Chillicothe, Ohio

Chillicothe Service Department is dedicated to delivering effective, efficient, friendly service with professionalism. The Service Department is tasked with the removal of dead animals from public areas and city streets.

Office: 740-773-2700

Dead Animals On The Roadways In Mentor, Ohio

If you notice a dead animal on a city roadway, please contact Mentor Public Works at (440) 974-5781 weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. During all other times, call the Police Department’s non-emergency number at (440) 974-5789.

Contact The Cottom's Wildlife Removal Company Of Ohio To Remove A Dead Animal Or Dead Deer From Your Property

Contact The Cottom’s Wildlife Removal Company Of Ohio To Remove A Dead Animal Or Dead Deer From Your Property

Humane Wildlife Solutions In The Buckeye State Capital

Humane Wildlife Removal Services In Columbus, Ohio

Speaking of…Orphaned & Injured Wildlife
Uploaded By City of Mentor, Ohio On April 19, 2021 [CityOfMentor.com]

What do you do when you encounter an orphaned or injured animal? We’re joined by Jamey Emmert, Communications Specialist with the Ohio Department of Natural Resources with answers to some common questions. Want to know more? Call ODNR’s Wildlife hotline at 1-800-WILDLIFE \ (800) 945-3543.

Expert Wildlife Trapping & Animal Removal Services For Cleveland And Northern Ohio Homeowners And Businesses – Call 440-236-8114 24/7

Call 440-236-8114 day or night to schedule an inspection and to talk with a licensed and certified wildlife control expert. CWR pest control technicians are experts at raccoon, bat, skunk, squirrel, bird and mice trapping, removal and prevention in Cleveland, Ohio.

Wildlife Removal Cleveland - CWR Traps And Removes Wildlife, Wild Animals, Nuisance Wildlife, Raccoons, Birds, Rodents, Bats, From Attics And Houses In Cuyahoga County And Other Northern Ohio Cities

Humane Wildlife Removal Company In Cleveland, Ohio – CWR is licensed, insured, bonded and certified in Ohio. Expert pest control technicians trap and remove raccoons, bats, skunks and squirrels. They get rid of small mammals, voles, moles, birds, mice, rodents, and pests. Cleveland wildlife removal experts remove and exclude nuisance wildlife and wild animals from homes, attics, roofs, chimneys, garages and yards throughout Northern Ohio. On-site wildlife inspection and removal costs start at $399+.

State Regulations In Ohio For The Disposal Of Animal Carcasses

Section 941.14 | Disposal Of Dead Or Destroyed Animals.
Ohio Revised Code/Title 9 Agriculture-Animals-Fences/Chapter 941 Animal Diseases
Effective: January 1, 2016 | Latest Legislation: House Bill 131, House Bill 64 – 131st General Assembly | PDF: Download Authenticated PDF

(A) The owner shall burn the body of an animal that has died of, or been destroyed because of, a dangerously infectious or contagious disease, bury it not less than four feet under the surface of the ground, dissolve it by alkaline hydrolysis, remove it in a watertight tank to a rendering establishment, or otherwise dispose of it in accordance with section 939.04 or 953.26 of the Revised Code within twenty-four hours after knowledge thereof or after notice in writing from the department of agriculture.

(B) The owner of premises that contain a dead animal shall burn the body of the animal, bury it not less than four feet beneath the surface of the ground, dissolve it by alkaline hydrolysis, remove it in a watertight tank to a rendering establishment, or otherwise dispose of it in accordance with section 939.04 or 953.26 of the Revised Code within a reasonable time after knowledge thereof or after notice in writing from the department or from the township trustees of the township in which the owner’s premises are located.

(C) The director of agriculture may adopt rules in accordance with Chapter 119. of the Revised Code establishing requirements and procedures governing the disposal of the body of an animal that has died of, or been destroyed because of, a disease of concern.

(D) Notwithstanding division (A) or (B) of this section or rules adopted under division (C) of this section, the director, in written notice sent to the owner of a dead animal, may require the owner to employ a specific method of disposition of the body, including burning, burying, rendering, composting, or alkaline hydrolysis, when that method does not conflict with any law or rule governing the disposal of infectious wastes and, in the director’s judgment, is necessary for purposes of animal disease control. No person shall fail to employ the method of disposition required under this division.

(E) The director, in written notice sent to the owner of a dead animal, may prohibit the owner from transporting the body of the dead animal on any street or highway if that prohibition does not conflict with any law or rule governing the transportation of infectious wastes and, in the director’s judgment, is necessary for purposes of animal disease control. No person shall fail to comply with a prohibition issued under this division.

(F) As used in this section, “infectious wastes” has the same meaning as in section 3734.01 of the Revised Code, and “street” or “highway” has the same meaning as in section 4511.01 of the Revised Code.

The Legislative Service Commission presents the text of this section as a composite of the section as amended by multiple acts of the General Assembly. This presentation recognizes the principle stated in R.C. 1.52(B) that amendments are to be harmonized if reasonably capable of simultaneous operation.

Available Versions of this Section
October 17, 2011 – House Bill 229, 129th General Assembly [ View October 17, 2011 Version ]
January 1, 2016 – House Bill 131, House Bill 64, 131st General Assembly [ View January 1, 2016 Version ]

Section 941.15 | Owner Failing To Dispose Of Dead Animal.| Ohio Revised Code/Title 9 Agriculture-Animals-Fences/Chapter 941 Animal Diseases

Effective: August 10, 1994 Latest Legislation: Senate Bill 73 – 120th General Assembly | PDF: Download Authenticated PDF

If the owner of land fails to comply with section 941.14 of the Revised Code, the department of agriculture or the board of township trustees of the township in which the land is located shall have the body of the dead animal burned, buried, removed to a rendering establishment, or disposed of in accordance with section 953.26 of the Revised Code, as appropriate, and the cost thereof shall be added to the tax assessment of the land.

Available Versions of this Section
August 10, 1994 – Senate Bill 73, 120th General Assembly [ View August 10, 1994 Version ]

Section 939.04 | Composting Of Dead Animals.
Ohio Revised Code/Title 9 Agriculture-Animals-Fences/Chapter 939 Soil And Water Conservation

Effective: October 17, 2019 Latest Legislation: House Bill 166 – 133rd General Assembly PDF: Download Authenticated PDF

(A) A person who owns or operates an agricultural operation, or owns the animals raised by the owner or operator of an agricultural operation, and who wishes to conduct composting of dead animals resulting from the agricultural operation shall do both of the following:

(1) Participate in an educational course concerning composting conducted by OSU extension and obtain a certificate of completion for the course;

(2) Use the appropriate method, technique, or practice of composting established in rules adopted under division (E)(5) of section 939.02 of the Revised Code.

(B) A person who fails to comply with division (A) of this section shall prepare and operate under a composting plan required by the director of agriculture under division (A)(2) of section 939.02 of the Revised Code. If the person’s proposed composting plan is disapproved by the supervisors of the appropriate soil and water conservation district under division (S)(3) of section 940.06 of the Revised Code, the person may appeal the plan disapproval to the director, who shall afford the person a hearing. Following the hearing, the director shall uphold the plan disapproval or reverse it. If the director reverses the disapproval, the plan shall be deemed approved.

Available Versions of this Section
January 1, 2016 – House Bill 64, 131st General Assembly [ View January 1, 2016 Version ]
October 17, 2019 – Amended by House Bill 166, 133rd General Assembly [ View October 17, 2019 Version ]

Section 3734.029 | Application to compost products produced by facility composting dead animals.
Ohio Revised Code/Title 37 Health-Safety-Morals/Chapter 3734 Solid And Hazardous Wastes

Effective: January 1, 2016 Latest Legislation: House Bill 64 – 131st General Assembly PDF: Download Authenticated PDF

(A)(1) Except as otherwise provided in division (A)(2) of this section, the standards of quality for compost products established in rules adopted under division (A) of section 3734.028 of the Revised Code apply to compost products produced by a facility composting dead animals that is subject to section 939.04 of the Revised Code in addition to compost products produced by facilities subject to this chapter.

(2) The standards of quality established in rules adopted under division (A) of section 3734.028 of the Revised Code do not apply to the use, distribution for use, or giving away of the compost products produced by a composting facility subject to section 939.04 of the Revised Code when either of the following applies:

(a) The composting is conducted by the person who raises the animals and the compost product is used in agricultural operations owned or operated by that person, regardless of whether the person owns the animals;

(b) The composting is conducted by the person who owns the animals, but does not raise them and the compost product is used in agricultural operations either by a person who raises the animals or by a person who raises grain that is used to feed them and that is supplied by the owner of the animals.

(B) No owner or operator of a composting facility that is subject to regulation under section 939.04 of the Revised Code shall sell or offer for sale at retail or wholesale, distribute for use, or give away any compost product that does not comply with the standard of quality applicable under division (A) of this section for the use for which the product is being sold, offered for sale, distributed, or given away.

No person shall violate this division.

Available Versions of this Section
August 10, 1994 – Senate Bill 73, 120th General Assembly [ View August 10, 1994 Version ]
January 1, 2016 – House Bill 64, 131st General Assembly [ View January 1, 2016 Version ]

Ohio Division of Soil and Water Conservation
Address: 2045 Morse Rd #B, Columbus, OH 43229

ODNR Asks Hunters To Help Keep Ohio’s Deer Healthy
Posted October 23, 2019 By The Ohio Department of Natural Resources

COLUMBUS, Ohio – The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) Division of Wildlife is asking hunters to help keep Ohio’s wild white-tailed deer herd free of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). CWD is an incurable fatal neurological disease that affects members of the deer family including white-tailed deer, mule deer, elk, moose, and caribou.

There is no strong evidence that CWD is transmissible to humans; however, hunters are encouraged to follow standard precautions when handling deer, including:

  • Wear rubber gloves when field-dressing and butchering, and thoroughly wash hands afterward.
  • Minimize the handling of brain, spinal cord, eyes, spleen, tonsils, and lymph nodes.
  • Do not consume meat from any animal that appears sick or tests positive for CWD.
  • Hunters have the option to have their deer tested by the Ohio Department of Agriculture’s Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory for a fee. Please call 614-728-6220 for more information.

To help protect Ohio’s deer herd from CWD, hunters should properly dispose of their deer carcasses by double-bagging all high-risk parts (brain, spinal cord, eyes, and lymphoid tissue) and setting it out with their household garbage for trash pickup. Those without trash pickup can double bag the carcass and take it to a municipal solid waste landfill or bury the carcass at least 3 feet deep on the property of harvest. The proper handling of carcasses, trims, and parts dramatically decreases the odds of introducing CWD into Ohio’s wild deer herd.

Portions of Holmes and Tuscarawas counties were declared a Disease Surveillance Area (DSA) in 2018. Specific regulations apply to hunters, including mandatory disease testing during the seven-day gun season. Inspection station locations may be found in the 2020-2021 Hunting Regulations guidebook and at wildohio.gov. Inspection stations will be self-serve and unmanned this year, however participation is still required.

Voluntary CWD sampling is also taking place in northwest Ohio again this year. Hunters who harvest a deer in Lucas, Fulton, and Williams counties are encouraged to submit samples for testing. Self-serve kiosk locations can be found on the wildlife diseases page at wildohio.gov.

To minimize the risk of spreading CWD, hunters planning to hunt outside of Ohio are reminded to follow carcass regulations prior to returning. No person is permitted to bring high-risk carcass parts of CWD-susceptible species (white-tailed deer, black-tailed deer, mule deer, elk, caribou, or moose) into Ohio. High-risk carcass parts may be transported through Ohio if they are not unloaded within the state.

If you hunt outside Ohio, you must bone out the meat before returning to the state with an elk, mule deer, white-tailed deer, black-tailed deer, caribou, or moose. Only the following parts may be brought into Ohio:

  • Quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached;
  • Meat that is boned out, securely and completely wrapped either commercially or privately;
  • Cleaned hides with no heads attached;
  • Skull plates that have been cleaned of all meat and brain tissue;
  • Antlers with no meat or tissue attached;
  • Cleaned upper canine teeth;
  • Hides and capes without any part of the head or lymph nodes attached; or
  • Finished taxidermy mounts.

More information about CWD and actions to take to help protect Ohio’s wild deer can be found in the 2019-2020 Ohio Deer Summary. Hunters can direct questions to their county wildlife officer, 800-WILDLIFE (800-945-3543), or a wildlife district office.

The Division of Wildlife is responsible for managing Ohio’s fish and wildlife resources for the benefit of all Ohioans. The Division of Wildlife greatly appreciates the cooperation of hunters in helping monitor Ohio’s deer herd. For more information about CWD, visit wildohio.gov.

The mission of the Division of Wildlife is to conserve and improve fish and wildlife resources and their habitats for sustainable use and appreciation by all. Visit wildohio.gov to find out more.

ODNR ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR website at ohiodnr.gov.

Ohio Wildlife Information And Wildlife Services

Division of Wildlife | Ohio Department of Natural Resources

A department of incredible diversity, ODNR owns and manages more than 800,000 acres of land, including 75 state parks, 24 state forests, 138 state nature preserves, and 150 wildlife areas.

The Division of Wildlife’s mission is to conserve and improve fish and wildlife resources and their habitats for sustainable use and appreciation by all.

Customer Service
1-800-WILDLIFE (945-3543)
wildinfo@dnr.ohio.gov
Monday – Friday 8AM – 5PM EST

Report a Wildlife Violation
1-800-POACHER (762-2437)
Report online

County Wildlife Officers

State Headquarters
2045 Morse Road
Building G
Columbus, OH, 43229
1-800-WILDLIFE (945-3543)

Ohio Division of Wildlife On Facebook

Download The Ohio Nuisance Wild Animal Control Certification Manual PDF Here - The Commercial Nuisance Wild Animal Control Operator License is considered a specialty license. Information regarding this license, including the test, study materials and application can be found at wildohio.gov.

Download The Ohio Nuisance Wild Animal Control Certification Manual PDF Here – The Commercial Nuisance Wild Animal Control Operator License is considered a specialty license. Information regarding this license, including the test, study materials and application can be found at wildohio.gov.

Information On Wildlife Services In Ohio From The ODNR

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) is the Ohio state government agency charged with ensuring “a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all.” Ohio wildlife officials rescue injured bald eagles.

ODNR regulates the oil and gas industry, the mining industry, hunting and fishing, and dams, while maintaining natural resources such as state parks, state nature preserves, state wildlife areas, state forests, and state waterways. It was created in 1949 by the Ohio Legislature.

In May of 2021, the Ohio Department of Natural Resources and the Department of Mental Health kicked off Mental Health Awareness month by pairing up to create a new initiative called “Thrive Outside.”

The ODNR Division of Wildlife stocked more that 40 million sport fish in Ohio’s waters in 2020, including channel catfish, walleye, steelhead, saugeye, muskellunge, brown trout, rainbow trout, blue catfish, and hybrid striped bass.

In addition, ODNR licenses all hunting, fishing, and watercraft in the state and is responsible for overseeing and permitting all mineral extraction, monitoring dam safety, managing water resources, coordinating the activity of Ohio’s 88 county soil and water conservation districts, mapping the state’s major geologic structures and mineral resources, and promoting recycling and litter prevention through grant programs in local communities.

Visit The Website For The Ohio Department Of Natural Resources - Department Of Wildlife. The government agency in Ohio, ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. The Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) owns and manages more than 590,000 acres of land including 74 state parks, 21 state forests, 136 state nature preserves, and 117 wildlife areas. The department also has jurisdiction over more than 120,000 acres of inland waters; 7,000 miles of streams; 481 miles of Ohio River; and 2-1/4 million acres of Lake Erie.

Visit the website for the Ohio Department Of Natural Resources – Department Of Wildlife. The government agency in Ohio, ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. The Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) owns and manages more than 590,000 acres of land including 74 state parks, 21 state forests, 136 state nature preserves, and 117 wildlife areas. The department also has jurisdiction over more than 120,000 acres of inland waters; 7,000 miles of streams; 481 miles of Ohio River; and 2-1/4 million acres of Lake Erie.

Download the

Download the “Mammals Of Ohio Field Guide” from the Ohio Department Of Wildlife, here. This booklet is produced by the ODNR Division of Wildlife as a free publication.

Minimum Standards For Wildlife Rehabilitation In Ohio - Download the PDF from the Ohio Department Of Natural Resources.

Minimum Standards For Wildlife Rehabilitation In Ohio – Download the PDF from the Ohio Department Of Natural Resources, here.

Wildlife Services State Offices – USDA APHIS
U.S. Department Of Agriculture – Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service

Wildlife Services State Director: Andrew J. Montoney, Ohio
4469 Professional Parkway
Groveport, OH 43125
Phone: 614-993-3444
FAX: 614-836-5597
Toll-Free Number: 1-866-4USDAWS
(1-866-487-3297)
Andrew.j.montoney@aphis.usda.gov
www.aphis.usda.gov/wildlife-damage/

USDA Resolves Wildlife Conflicts in Ohio

Every day, the Wildlife Services (WS) program in Ohio helps citizens, organizations, industries, and Government agencies resolve conflicts with wildlife to protect agriculture, other property, and natural resources, and to safeguard human health and safety. WS’ professional wildlife biologists and specialists implement effective, selective, and responsible strategies that value wildlife, the environment, and the resources being protected. WS manages wildlife damage according to its public trust stewardship responsibilities as a Federal natural resource management program. The program supports the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation, based on the principle that wildlife resources are owned collectively and held in trust by Government for the benefit of present and future generations.

WS oversees a multitude of programs and projects within Ohio to resolve human/wildlife conflicts. WS works on airports to prevent aircraft-wildlife collisions. WS conducts disease surveillance to monitor wildlife diseases that threaten the health of people, pets, livestock, and wildlife. WS provides leadership and is a member of the Ohio Rabies Taskforce, and works year-round to stop raccoon variant rabies (RVR) from spreading westward and to eliminate the disease from the State.

Ohio’s livestock producers and crop farmers rely on WS’ expertise in resolving conflicts with wildlife such as coyotes, black vultures, feral swine, and blackbirds. As a member of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Task Force, WS-Ohio works to reduce predation on threatened species of turtles, manage mute swans to support trumpeter swan introduction and eliminate feral swine populations to protect natural resources and agriculture in the Lake Erie Region of Ohio. WS works with local communities to reduce wildlife conflicts in urban areas.

Download the full report in PDF format,  here.

The Ohio Wildlife Center, is located in Powell, Ohio (614-734-9453) and was founded in 1984. It offers humane pest control and animal rehabilitation services while fostering awareness and appreciation for Ohio's native wildlife through rehabilitation, education and wildlife health studies. They are a 501c3 nonprofit that operates the state's largest, donation-supported Wildlife Hospital with on-site veterinary care. They serve the local community and state in wildlife rescues and rehabilitation. The Center receives no operational funds from any local, state, or federal government tax funding. The Ohio Wildlife Center is a premier nonprofit wildlife rehabilitation organization, nationally recognized as an authority on native Ohio wildlife issues. The Ohio Wildlife Center was founded in 1984 by Animal Care Unlimited veterinarian, Dr. Donald L. Burton. The Ohio Wildlife Center's Hospital (614-793-9453) is located at 2661 Billingsley Rd, Columbus, OH 43235. Ohio Wildlife Center partners with hundreds of volunteers across all areas of the organization to make their mission possible. Volunteers can normally choose to work in wildlife care, education, InfoLine services, transport, produce pickup, special events, community outreach, and office support.

The Ohio Wildlife Center, is located at 6131 Cook Road in Powell, Ohio (614-734-9453) and was founded in 1984. It offers humane pest control and animal rehabilitation services while fostering awareness and appreciation for Ohio’s native wildlife through rehabilitation, education and wildlife health studies. They are a 501c3 nonprofit that operates the state’s largest, donation-supported Wildlife Hospital with on-site veterinary care. They serve the local community and state in wildlife rescues and rehabilitation. The Center receives no operational funds from any local, state, or federal government tax funding. The Ohio Wildlife Center is a premier nonprofit wildlife rehabilitation organization, nationally recognized as an authority on native Ohio wildlife issues. The Ohio Wildlife Center was founded in 1984 by Animal Care Unlimited veterinarian, Dr. Donald L. Burton. The Ohio Wildlife Center’s Hospital (614-793-9453) is located at 2661 Billingsley Rd, Columbus, OH 43235. Ohio Wildlife Center partners with hundreds of volunteers across all areas of the organization to make their mission possible. Volunteers can normally choose to work in wildlife care, education, InfoLine services, transport, produce pickup, special events, community outreach, and office support.

Ohio Wildlife Center

The Ohio Wildlife Center offers humane pest control and animal rehabilitation services while fostering awareness and appreciation for Ohio’s native wildlife through rehabilitation, education and wildlife health studies.

Ohio Wildlife Center
Education & Administration
Business calls only. Scheduled programs.
6131 Cook Rd
Powell, Ohio 43065
614-734- 9453

Ohio Wildlife Center’s Hospital
Animal Admissions
2661 Billingsley Rd
Columbus, Ohio 43235
614-793-9453
Mon-Fri, 9am – 5pm
Sat-Sun 9am – 3pm

The state’s largest, donation-supported Wildlife Hospital with on-site veterinary care, treating more than 6,000 patients each year representing more than 150 species from more than 60 of Ohio’s 88 counties.

A 20-acre outdoor Education Center with more than 50 Animal Ambassadors that greet visitors during our public events, camps and group programming.

SCRAM! Wildlife Control, a fee-for-service solution for human-wildlife conflicts to assist central Ohio home and business owners with access to humane wildlife eviction and exclusion services. SCRAM! has operated since 2001.

Wildlife assistance for the public via social media and phone for step-by-step guidance with wildlife issues and questions.

Volunteer and internship opportunities – more than 250 volunteers annually participate in volunteer services in animal care, education programming, events and administrative support.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service | Ohio Field Office
Midwest Region – Ohio Ecological Services Office

4625 Morse Road, Suite 104
Columbus, OH 43230
phone: 614-416-8993
e-mail: ohio@fws.gov
www.fws.gov/midwest/ohio/

The service works with public and private entities to conserve and restore Ohio’s endangered species, migratory birds, wetlands, and other important fish and wildlife resources.

The Ohio Field Office is the home of the Fish and Wildlife Service, Ecological Services Division, for the state of Ohio. They cover projects on or affecting all the land and water within Ohio as well as the western basin of Lake Erie.

The mission of the Fish and Wildlife Service is “working with others, to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife, and plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.” The Ohio Field Office uses that mission statement to guide all their our activities.

Ohio Wildlife Field Guides And Backyard Wildlife [Download PDFs From The Ohio Department Of Natural Resources]

List Of Mammals Of Ohio

This list of mammals of Ohio includes a total of 70 mammal species recorded in the state of Ohio. Of these, three (the American black bear, Indiana bat, and Allegheny woodrat) are listed as endangered in the state; four (the brown rat, black rat, house mouse, and wild boar) are introduced; two (the gray bat and Mexican free-tailed bat) are considered accidental; and eight (the American bison, elk, fisher cougar, Canada lynx, gray wolf, American marten, and wolverine) have been extirpated from the state. Read more here.

Raccoons In Ohio [From The Ohio Department Of Health]

Raccoons can be found throughout the state and in all habitat types, with the majority being found in northwestern and central Ohio along rivers and streams bordering farmland habitats. They have also moved into suburban and urban areas and can live almost any place where there is food for them to eat and a den to serve as shelter. Many of them live, temporarily at least, in drain tiles and sewer systems. Raccoons defecate in communal sites called latrines. They are nocturnal and are up and about during the dark hours of the night. Even though raccoons do not really hibernate, they can sleep for days, and even weeks at a time, during the cold winter months. Read more here.

About Wildlife In Ohio