We Get Rid Of Groundhogs In Ohio – Humane Trapping And Removal Services

Pictured here is a nuisance groundhog (woodchuck) that was caught in a live trap by Cottom's Wildlife Removal company for a customer in Cleveland. Groundhogs in Ohio are a nuisance around gardens, farms, building foundations and yards. The Cottom's Wildlife Removal company gets groundhogs out of yards, holes, gardens, garages, trees, crawl spaces, trees, car engines and from under sheds and houses.

Pictured here is a nuisance groundhog (woodchuck) that was caught in a live trap by Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company for a customer in Cleveland. Groundhogs in Ohio are a nuisance around gardens, sheds, farms, houses, buildings, patios, decks, foundations and yards. CWR gets groundhogs out of yards, holes, gardens, garages, trees, crawl spaces and even car engines – and also from under decks, patios, sheds and houses.

Groundhog Trapping, Control, Removal And Exclusion Services In Ohio – Call CWR 24/7 To Get Rid Of Groundhogs

In Ohio, Call CWR To Get Rid Of Groundhogs

If you live in Ohio, the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company is a better choice than trying to remove groundhogs yourself. Groundhogs in Ohio are a nuisance for farmers, gardeners and homeowners. In Ohio, nuisance groundhogs can be live-trapped legally by Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company.

Complete The Form Below To Contact CWR Regarding Your Groundhog Problem

How To Get Rid Of Groundhogs Safely And Humanely

Pictured here is Mike Cottom Sr., who founded the Cottom's Wildlife Removal company in Ohio in 1986. He is posing in front of one of the CWR pest control trucks in Upper Arlington, Ohio. He is holding a professional animal trap used to catch groundhogs. The steel mechanical live cage trap is non-lethal (humane) and features double doors.

Pictured here is Mike Cottom Sr., who founded the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company in Ohio in 1986. He is posing in front of one of the CWR pest control trucks parked in Upper Arlington near Columbus, Ohio. He is holding an animal control pole (catch pole) in one hand and a professional animal trap used to catch groundhogs in the other hand. The steel mechanical live cage trap is non-lethal (humane) and features double doors.

The Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company knows how to control groundhogs. CWR provides nuisance groundhog (woodchuck) trapping, control and removal services for homeowners and businesses in Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati, Dayton, Akron, Toledo, Clayton and other Ohio cities.

CWR pest control technicians use ingenious wildlife solutions to get rid of groundhogs, gophers, skunks, raccoons, squirrels, rodents, opossums, moles, voles and muskrats. Download a current list of licensed Commercial Nuisance Wild Animal Control Operators in Ohio that can get rid of groundhogs, here. Get a phone number for a local wildlife rescue and wildlife rehabilitation service or center near you in Ohio, here.

Why Groundhogs Are So Hard To Get Rid Of
Posted On YouTube On May 4, 2019 By Science Insider

Groundhogs Can Damage Gardens, Foundations, Homes, Yards, Plants And Trees

A groundhog can make a meal out of your freshly planted vegetable garden. Four-legged free loaders, such as groundhogs, are the number one concern among local gardeners in Cleveland, Ohio. If you are having issues with burrowing pests, get a few tips for identifying and getting rid of groundhogs in your yard and garden, here.

Simple fences can stop groundhogs (woodchucks) from destroying gardens and from burrowing tunnels. Find out more about what to do about groundhogs from The Humane Society Of The United States, here.  It is possible to humanely evict groundhogs.

Pictured here are 4 professional groundhog trappers that work for the Cottom's Wildlife Removal company in Ohio. They know how to get rid of groundhogs and keep them out of yards, gardens and from under houses, decks, sheds and patios.

Pictured here are 4 professional groundhog trappers that work for the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company in Ohio. They know how to get rid of groundhogs and keep them out of yards, gardens and from under houses, decks, sheds and patios.

CWR Stops Groundhogs From Damaging Yards, Gardens, Houses, Sheds, Decks, Foundations And Patios

Groundhogs are excellent burrowers and they use burrows for sleeping, rearing young and hibernating. Groundhogs can damage yards, gardens, sheds, house foundations, retaining walls, patios, decks and even driveways.  Their burrows can damage foundations of houses, barns and garages. If homeowners do not properly control groundhogs, these rodents can cause serious structural damage when burrowing with their strong claws.  These so-called “land beavers” and “whistle pigs” also destroy lawns and gardens.

Their burrows can be up to 6 feet deep. Learn the best ways to keep groundhogs out of your yard or garden, here. Find out how to use prevention, scare tactics, fencing and trapping to get rid of groundhogs, here.

Tips For Getting Rid Of Pesky Groundhogs
Posted On YouTube On July 12, 2020 By WIVBTV [WIVB.com]

Humane Groundhog Removal Solutions

Trapping and killing groundhogs is permitted in Ohio, but this control technique is not humane. The Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company prefers, whenever possible, to use wildlife exclusion devices to prevent groundhogs from getting under sheds, houses and foundations.

CWR groundhog control specialists use “excluders” with one way doors which are designed to let groundhogs get out from under decks, porches, crawl spaces, sheds and other man-made structures. CWR pest control technicians also are proficient at installing wildlife barriers, L-footer style fencing (underground barrier) and wire mesh to fence out digging animals such as groundhogs.

Good Luck for Woodchucks – Humane Groundhog Solutions!
Posted On February 2, 2015 By The Humane Society Of The United States [HumaneSociety.org]

How Much Does It Cost To Get Rid Of A Groundhog In A Yard Or Crawlspace? 

  • The cost to remove a groundhog that has been trapped by a homeowner starts at $95. This rate is for on-site visits that are within 40 miles of the CRW company headquarters in Columbia Station, Ohio. Different rates will apply based on the distance a CRW pest control technician will need to travel.
  • If a skunk, opossum or groundhog needs to be trapped by CWR, on-site inspection costs start at $239 in Ohio. This fee will be applied to the total cost.
  • Call CWR to schedule an inspection which will be used by the groundhog removal specialist to provide a written estimate for groundhog removal prices.
  • The work normally consists of  setting up a live trap and removing it once the groundhog has been trapped.
  • CWR pest control technicians prefer to trap groundhogs because it is more humane than extermination through the use of poisons and fumigants (toxic gas).

Who Do You Call To Pickup A Dead Deer Or Remove A Dead Animal In Ohio And How Much Does It Cost?

PICTURED HERE IS A DEAD DEER IN A BACKYARD IN OHIO - JUNE 10, 2021 - Who do you call to pick up a dead deer? The Cottom's Wildlife Removal (CWR) company removes and picks up deer carcasses and dead animals in Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati, Toledo, Dayton, Cleveland Heights, Akron, Marietta, Youngstown, Strongsville, Athens, Hamilton, Painesville, Canton, Springfield, Zanesville and other Ohio cities. Call CRW at 440-236-8114 in Cleveland/Northern Ohio, 614-300-2763 in Columbus/Central Ohio or 614-300-2763 in Cincinnati/Southern Ohio. How much does it cost to remove a dead deer in Ohio? Deer carcass removal and large animal removal costs start at $395.

PICTURED HERE IS A DEAD DEER IN A BACKYARD IN OHIO – JUNE 10, 2021 – Who do you call to pick up a dead deer? The Cottom’s Wildlife Removal (CWR) company finds, removes, picks up and disposes of deer carcasses and large dead animals in Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati, Toledo, Dayton, Cleveland Heights, Akron, Marietta, Youngstown, Strongsville, Athens, Hamilton, Painesville, Canton, Springfield, Zanesville and other Ohio cities. Call CRW at 440-236-8114 in Cleveland/Northern Ohio, 614-300-2763 in Columbus/Central Ohio or 614-300-2763 in Cincinnati/Southern Ohio. How much does it cost to remove a dead deer in Ohio? Deer carcass removal and large animal removal costs start at $395. Small dead animal removal and disposal rates start at $125.

How much does it cost to remove a dead deer? Deer carcass removal costs start at $395. In Ohio, call CWR at 440-236-8114 in Cleveland, 614-300-2763 in Columbus or 513-808-9530 in Cincinnati to get a quote for CRW to pick up a dead deer or dead animal. Prices to pick up a dead animal from your yard or property start at $125.

Ohio Division Of Natural Resources Wildlife District Offices

People should always avoid touching or handling sick or dead wild animals. Because Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease (EHD) affects some white-tailed deer, the Ohio Department Of Natural Resources suggests that Ohioans report sick or dead deer to the Division of Wildlife. Sightings of sick or dead deer should be reported your local Ohio wildlife officer or wildlife district office.

Who Do You Call To Pick Up A Dead Raccoon In Ohio?

PICTURED HERE IS A DEAD RACCOON THAT WAS REMOVED FROM A YARD IN CLEVELAND, OHIO BY THE COTTOM'S WILDLIFE REMOVAL COMPANY - It is important to keep dead raccoons out of pools, houses, yards, basements and attics. Raccoon feces contains the eggs of a worm which can infect humans and cause severe neurologic illness. CWR is a professional wildlife removal company headquartered in Ohio that first finds, and then gets dead raccoons and deceased animals out of houses, walls and attics in Ohio. The animal control specialists at CWR get dead mice, dead snakes, birds, squirrels, deer, skunks, opossums and bats out of businesses, homes, apartments, sheds, outbuildings, garages, basements, backyards, vents, pools, chimneys, ductwork and from under decks and porches. If you are searching online for "dead animal removal near me", "how to get rid of a dead animal in your yard" or "dead animal removal cost" and you live in Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati or another city in Ohio call 440-236-8114 in Cleveland, 614-300-2763 in Columbus or 513-808-9530 in Cincinnati. When you contact CWR by phone, you can request a quote for animal carcass removal services and schedule a good time to have a dead animal located, picked up, taken away and disposed of. CWR dead animal removal experts also eliminate dead animal smells in houses and outside for Ohio residents. As domestic animal carcasses and pets decompose, bacteria is released that exposes people to disease causing pathogens. Owners of pets and domestic animals in Ohio are responsible for their disposal. The risk to humans from animal carcasses is low if proper precautions are taken. CWR's wild animal feces removal, bird dropping removal and bat guano removal services in Ohio start at $495.

PICTURED HERE IS A DEAD RACCOON THAT WAS REMOVED FROM A YARD IN CLEVELAND, OHIO BY THE COTTOM’S WILDLIFE REMOVAL COMPANY – June 16, 2021 – It is important to keep dead raccoons out of pools, houses, yards, basements and attics. Raccoon feces contains the eggs of a worm which can infect humans and cause severe neurologic illness. CWR is a professional wildlife removal company headquartered in Ohio that first finds, and then gets dead raccoons and deceased animals out of houses, walls and attics in Ohio. The animal control specialists at CWR get dead mice, dead snakes, dead birds, dead squirrels, dead deer, dead skunks, dead groundhogs, dead opossums and dead bats out of businesses, homes, apartments, sheds, outbuildings, garages, basements, backyards, vents, pools, chimneys, ductwork and from under decks and porches. If you are searching online for “dead animal removal near me”, “how to get rid of a dead animal in your yard” or “dead animal removal cost” and you live in Ohio call 440-236-8114 in Cleveland, 614-300-2763 in Columbus or 513-808-9530 in Cincinnati. When you contact CWR by phone, you can request a quote for animal carcass removal services and schedule a good time to have a dead animal located, picked up, taken away and disposed of. CWR dead animal removal experts also eliminate dead animal smells inside and outside of houses for Ohio residents. As domestic animal carcasses and pets decompose, bacteria is released that exposes people to disease causing pathogens. Owners of pets and domestic animals in Ohio are responsible for their disposal. The risk to humans from animal carcasses is low if proper precautions are taken. CWR’s wild animal feces removal, bird dropping removal and bat guano removal services in Ohio start at $495. Prices to pick up and get rid of a small dead wild animal, bird or deceased pet from your yard, property or house in Ohio start at $125. Large animal and dead deer removal costs in Ohio start at $395.

Who Traps Wildlife And Nuisance Animals In Ohio?

Trapping is regularly used for nuisance wild animal control in Ohio in order to limit damage to food supplies, property, households, lawns, buildings, farming and ranching. Wildlife are typically defined as free-ranging, terrestrial vertebrates.

Animals are frequently trapped by CWR in Cleveland, Columbus, Springfield, Dayton, Cincinnati and Toledo to prevent damage to personal property, including the killing of livestock by predatory animals such as coyotes, weasels and foxes. Find out how much wildlife trapping costs in Ohio, here. Learn about the wildlife relocation options available in Ohio, here. Get information about wildlife rescue, transportation and rehabilitation in Ohio, here.

PICTURED HERE IS ALEX, A WILDLIFE TRAPPER AT COTTOMS WILDLIFE REMOVAL COMPANY - Alex believes that trapping nuisance wild animals can be an effective method of reducing the spread of harmful diseases while also managing and controlling damage caused by the wildlife in Ohio.

PICTURED HERE IS ALEX, A WILDLIFE TRAPPER AT COTTOM’S WILDLIFE REMOVAL COMPANY – Alex believes that trapping nuisance wild animals can be an effective method of reducing the spread of harmful diseases while also managing and controlling damage caused by the wildlife in Ohio.

Humane live trapping is one of the most common nuisance wildlife control methods used in Ohio by pest management professionals and nuisance wildlife management professionals such as Mike Cottom Sr. and Mike Cottom Jr. at the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company.

The Humane Society of the United States works with community leaders and animal care and control agencies to create Wild Neighbors communities, where humane and non-lethal solutions are given priority when addressing conflicts between people and wildlife. Find answers to wildlife problems, here. The Humane Society of the United States recommends scrapping the trap when evicting wildlife.

RED FOX WALKING PAST A COTTAGE IN OHIO - The red fox is one of two fox species in Ohio and one of five in North America. The state’s other fox is the gray fox. Foxes are trapped in Ohio by the Cottom's Wildlife Removal company when necessary. The best bait for foxes is fresh or canned fish, chicken, pork, eggs, sugar coated vegetables, fishy-smelling cat food, or other types meat. CRW uses humane live cage traps to control and manage coyotes, red foxes, bobcats, rodents, otters, opossums, muskrats, skunks, raccoons, groundhogs, beavers, moles, voles, snakes, coyote and squirrels in Ohio.

RED FOX WALKING PAST A COTTAGE IN OHIO – The red fox is one of two fox species in Ohio and one of five in North America. The state’s other fox is the gray fox. Foxes are trapped in Ohio by the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company when necessary. The best bait for foxes is fresh or canned fish, chicken, pork, eggs, sugar coated vegetables, fishy-smelling cat food, or other types meat. CRW uses humane live cage traps to control and manage coyotes, red foxes, bobcats, rodents, otters, opossums, muskrats, skunks, raccoons, groundhogs, beavers, moles, voles, snakes, coyote and squirrels in Ohio.

CWR wildlife trappers know how to prevent and control coyote problems in Ohio. CRW animal trappers use trapping tactics that work for coyotes and foxes. A fox cutting through your yard is probably just passing through on their way between hunting areas and no action is necessary on your part. Learn more about trapping coyotes in Ohio, here.

On behalf of tenants and landowners in Ohio, the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company traps live, non-migratory animals (except white-tailed deer, black bear or wild turkey) when these animals become a nuisance. The experienced trappers at CRW know the best practices and the key principles and techniques of capturing animals on land, in and around water to manage wildlife damage.

CWR also specializes in “animal proofing” (exclusion) to keep nuisance wildlife out of homes, attics, basements, sheds, garages and outbuildings. CWR is a full service wildlife company that frequently disinfects, sanitizes and decontaminates infested areas of structures and property in Northern, Central and Southern, Ohio.

The Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company provides Ohioans with nuisance wild animal control services for a fee. Ohio residents and wildlife should be able to coexist in most situations. If conflicts arise, the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company is a better choice than trying to trap and remove wildlife and animals yourself. Learn more about the details of wildlife control and wild animal removal services in Ohio, here.

PICTURED HERE ARE 3 CWR WILDLIFE SERVICE VEHICLES APPROACHING DOWNTOWN CLEVELAND OHIO - The City Of Cleveland Animal Control Services and the Cottom's Wildlife Removal company both manage human-wildlife conflicts in the Northeast Ohio community. Pictured here are 3 of CRW's pest control trucks on the highway heading to a large wildlife trapping, removal and exclusion project for a concerned commercial client.

PICTURED HERE ARE 3 CWR WILDLIFE SERVICE VEHICLES APPROACHING DOWNTOWN CLEVELAND OHIO – The City Of Cleveland Animal Control Services and the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company both manage human-wildlife conflicts in the Northeast Ohio community. Pictured here are 3 of CRW’s pest control trucks on the highway heading to a large wildlife trapping, removal and exclusion project for a concerned commercial client.

However, there may be times when Ohio property owners need to call a professional wildlife control operator at 440-236-8114 in Cleveland, 614-300-2763 in Columbus or 513-808-9530 in Cincinnati. CRW traps raccoons, skunks, opossums, groundhogs, beavers, coyotessquirrels and other wild animals. CRW is licensed by the State of Ohio as a “Commercial Nuisance Wild Animal Control Operator” and is fully insured.

State laws and federal laws protect virtually all wildlife, wild animals and wild places. These statutes regulate which species can be harassed, harvested, trapped, harmed or hunted. The animal trappers at CRW are experts at resolving human-nuisance wildlife conflicts in Hamilton, Canton, Youngstown, Maumee, Ashtabula, Lima, Sandusky, Strongsville, Athens, Chillicothe and Cleveland Heights, Ohio.

It is illegal in Ohio to fail to euthanize, or release on site, any nuisance animals, skunk, raccoon, squirrel, beaver, coyote, red fox, or opossum that is captured, trapped or taken. A violation of a nuisance wild animal control law or rule in Ohio may result in criminal charges [PDF]. However, the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company is legally permitted to remove a trapped animal from a customer’s property because CRW holds an Ohio CNWACO license.

Learn about methods used to capture mammals, handle mammals and care for mammals, here. These methods, which include trapping and netting, must be designed to keep captive animals alive, uninjured, well provisioned and comfortable.

CRW captures, handles and catches animals remotely in Ohio by using leather gloves, catch poles, protective clothing, humane animal traps, foothold traps, snares, body gripping traps, live cage traps (box traps) and conibear traps. CRW wildlife trappers prefer to use humane live cage traps whenever possible. Glue traps and glue boards are NOT recommended. Learn how wild animals are trapped, here. Find out which baits are best for live trapping, here.

Before CRW pest control technicians begin trapping wildlife for a customer, they have a suitable plan for what to do with the trapped animal. Learn how to use traps to catch nuisance wildlife in your yard, here. Get familiar with wildlife damage management tools and techniques, here. Stay informed about wildlife and nuisance wild animals in Ohio, here.

Speaking of…Orphaned & Injured Wildlife
Uploaded By City of Mentor, Ohio On April 19, 2021 [CityOfMentor.com]

What do you do when you encounter an orphaned or injured animal? We’re joined by Jamey Emmert, Communications Specialist with the Ohio Department of Natural Resources with answers to some common questions. Want to know more? Call ODNR’s Wildlife hotline at 1-800-WILDLIFE \ (800) 945-3543.

Groundhogs Are A Nuisance Species In Ohio [Groundhog Control Information From The Ohio Department of Natural Resources]

Groundhogs, also known as woodchucks, usually are viewed as nuisance animals for homeowners and farmers. The major problems that they cause are the large holes they dig and the damage that occurs from this animal. Their holes can be 8-12 inches in size. This animal creates two, sometimes three holes, with a large tunnel system that runs from one hole to the next. They usually will have a large mound of dirt in front of the hole called a porch. Groundhogs use this to stand high to get a good view of their surroundings before making their move to venture around. Farmers get crop damage to corn, soybeans and other crops planted in fields. Groundhog dens are a major concern for farmers because of the large tunnel system they build under the ground. Farmers have been known to sink tractor tires in the ground because of the big hole that lies below the surface of the field. Most homeowners deal with groundhogs denning under their porch or shed and damaging their gardens. A den that is built next to a building or house can cause structural damage as their burrows can weaken foundation. Contrary to what most people believe, groundhogs will climb trees. Tree nurseries can face problems with them gnawing on their ornamental or fruit-bearing trees. Other wildlife such as fox or skunks will take over groundhog holes when left vacant.

If you are dealing with a nuisance groundhog on your property there are a few things you can try to prevent damage. Placing fencing around the garden or underneath your porch is a way to keep them out. However, groundhogs are good climbers and diggers. Fences should be at least 3 feet tall and made of heavy, thick wire such as hardware cloth. Burying the lower portion of the fence into the ground at least a foot should help to prevent them from digging underground. At tree nurseries, placing metal flashing or tree guards around the trees at least 3 feet high will prevent wildlife from stripping the bark and destroying the trees. Once a groundhog is present and living on your property, they are hard to get to move along. The best way to get rid of them is to physically remove them. Nuisance groundhogs can be live-trapped and relocated with permission of the landowner. If you choose not to relocate the groundhog, they can either be released on-site where the animal was originally trapped or you may humanely kill it. Refer to the American Veterinary Medical Association for guidelines on euthanasia. Landowners who chose to set traps themselves to catch groundhogs should remember that they are responsible for the animal in the trap. Each trap must be labeled with your name and address, checked every 24 hours and animals removed within 24 hours of being trapped. This is especially important to note when you are trapping within city limits. If you are trapping within city limits, you should always check with your police department to determine if there are any ordinances governing trapping in your community. If you do not want to remove the animal yourself, the Division of Wildlife licenses nuisance trappers that can be contracted with to remove the problem groundhog for a fee.

There is an open hunting season on groundhogs, meaning they may be hunted any time of the year. Refer to the Hunting and Trapping Regulations for additional information.

Groundhog Control Phone Numbers For Ohio

  • For commercial and residential groundhog control, groundhog trapping, groundhog removal and groundhog exclusion services in Dayton, Cincinnati, Hamilton, Portsmouth, Athens, Marietta, Chillicothe and Southern, Ohio call 513-808-9530.
  • For commercial and residential groundhog control, groundhog trapping, groundhog removal and groundhog exclusion services in Toledo, Lorain, Elyria, Sandusky, Cleveland, Strongsville, Lakewood, Mentor, Akron, Canton, Youngstown and Northern, Ohio call 440-236-8114.
  • For commercial and residential groundhog control, groundhog trapping, groundhog removal and groundhog exclusion services in Columbus, Dublin, Powell, Gahanna, Canal Winchester, Washington Court House, Zanesville, Steubenville, Lancaster, Newark, Marion and Central, Ohio call 614-300-27630.

Can You Shoot Groundhogs In Ohio?

Yes, according to hunting guidelines. Groundhogs can be hunted most of the year in Ohio, though spring and summer is the most popular time. In Ohio, it is legal for a homeowner to live-trap and relocate a nuisance groundhog with the landowner’s permission. It is also legal to release a groundhog on-site or humanely kill it.

In Ohio, groundhog hunting is closed during the seven-day deer gun season (November 29-December 5, 2021; December 18-19, 2021). Learn more about hunting and trapping regulations in Ohio, here. However, many cities in Ohio prohibit discharging a firearm or firing a weapon within city limits.

How To Control Groundhogs On Farms In Ohio

Groundhogs love to eat soybean plants. One family of groundhogs can consume a tenth to a quarter of an acre of soybeans. Farmers and rural landowners complain of the damaging effects of groundhogs and control them in a number of ways including fencing, frightening them, toxic gases and trapping. Farmers also deal with groundhogs by calling a qualified pest control provider such as the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company.

Groundhogs in Ohio cause major damage to home gardens and farmers and home gardeners. They devour vegetables and create burrows that leave the soil weak. This can cause damage to farm equipment. Horses and livestock are injured every year in Ohio by groundhog holes and burrows.

Wire mesh fences can deter groundhogs from destroying crops and gardens. Ammonia soaked rags also deter groundhogs.

Cleveland Ohio Skyline Photo - CWR pest control technicians provide expert wildlife trapping, animal control, raccoon removal, skunk removal, bat removal, squirrel removal and bird removal services for Cleveland and Northern Ohio homeowners and businesses. You can contact CWR at 216-236-8114 or Cleveland's Division of Animal Control at 216-664-3069. Cleveland residents have several service options to choose from regarding nuisance wildlife.

CWR pest control technicians provide expert wildlife trapping, animal control, raccoon removal, skunk removal, bat removal, squirrel removal and bird removal services for Cleveland and Northern Ohio homeowners and businesses. You can contact CWR at 216-236-8114 or Cleveland’s Division of Animal Control at 216-664-3069. Cleveland residents have several service options to choose from regarding nuisance wildlife.

Contact Ohio’s Most Renowned Groundhog Trappers

Wildlife Rehabilitators
Posted On YouTube On January 12, 2018 By OhioDNR [OhioDNR.gov]

Who Do You Call When You See An Injured Animal In Ohio?

Learn what you can do if you believe a wild animal in Ohio is orphaned or injured, here. The goal of wildlife rehabilitation is to provide professional care to sick, injured, and orphaned wild animals so ultimately they can be returned to their natural habitat. Wildlife rehabilitation is the treatment and care of injured, orphaned, or sick wild animals so that they can be released back to the wild. Find out if wildlife trapping and wildlife relocation is the best option, here.

Some concerned citizens in Ohio want to know who to call for injured wildlife. If the animal has bleeding, broken bones or another obvious injury – you can bring the animal to Ohio Wildlife Center’s Hospital during open hours. See rescue and transport instructions.

Ohio wildlife officials rescue injured bald eagles. Wildlife lovers in Cleveland, Columbus, Toledo, Dayton, Canton, Athens, Marietta, Ashtabula and Cincinnati search online for a local wildlife rehabilitator near them to take care of an ill, injured or orphaned animal. Get phone numbers for a wildlife rescue service or wildlife rehabilitation center near you in Ohio, here. Wildlife rescue services are available near Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati, Dayton, Dublin, Toledo, Akron, Canton, Troy, Lima, Mansfield, Zanesville and Lake County.

Humane Wildlife Solutions In The Buckeye State Capital

Humane Wildlife Removal Services In Columbus, Ohio

Wildlife Relocation Options In Ohio

Trapping And Relocating Wildlife And Bird Nests In Ohio Is NOT A Good Long-Term Solution And Is Illegal In Certain Situations - Find Out How To Live Peacefully With Raccoons, Squirrels And Groundhogs In Ohio

Trapping And Relocating Wildlife And Bird Nests In Ohio Is NOT A Good Long-Term Solution And Is Illegal In Certain Situations – Find Out How To Live Peacefully With Raccoons, Squirrels, Birds And Groundhogs In Ohio

Wild animal babies in Ohio are unintentionally orphaned and too often die of starvation, because their mother is trapped and removed. People and wildlife can peacefully coexist in most situations. However, there may be times when conflicts arise. Get a phone number for a local wildlife rescue, permitted wildlife rehabilitation services or a wildlife rehabilitation center near you in Ohio, here. Hire a wildlife removal professional in Ohio that uses humane and effective practices to remove raccoons, bats, groundhogs, birds and skunks. Download the “Humane Wildlife Conflict Resolution Guide” from The Humane Society of the United States, here.

Expert Groundhog Control, Wildlife Trapping & Animal Removal Services For Cleveland And Northern Ohio Homeowners And Businesses – Call 440-236-8114 24/7

Call 440-236-8114 day or night to schedule an inspection and to talk with a licensed and certified wildlife control expert. CWR pest control technicians are experts at groundhog, raccoon, bat, skunk, squirrel, bird and mice trapping, removal and prevention in Cleveland, Ohio.

Wildlife Removal Cleveland - CWR Traps And Removes Wildlife, Wild Animals, Nuisance Wildlife, Woodchucks, Raccoons, Birds, Rodents, Bats, From Attics And Houses In Cuyahoga County And Other Northern Ohio Cities

Cleveland Wildlife Removal – CWR is licensed, insured, bonded and certified in Ohio. Expert pest control technicians trap and remove raccoons, groundhogs, bats, skunks and squirrels. They get rid of small mammals, voles, moles, birds, mice, rodents, and pests. Cleveland wildlife removal experts remove and exclude nuisance wildlife and wild animals from homes, attics, roofs, chimneys, garages and yards throughout Northern Ohio. On-site wildlife inspection and removal costs start at $239+.

Ohio Squirrel Trapping, Removal, Exclusion And Control Company

Cottom's Wildlife Removal Is One Of The Best Squirrel Removal Companies And Repair Services Near You In Columbus, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Dayton, Akron And Canton Ohio

Request A Home Inspection Or A Quote For Squirrel Removal | Cottom’s Wildlife Removal Is One Of The Best Squirrel Removal Companies And Repair Services Near You In Columbus, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Dayton, Akron And Canton Ohio

CWR Gets Squirrels Out Of  Houses, Attics, Roofs, Yards, Soffits, Gardens, Sheds, Outbuildings, Rental Properties, Apartments And Garages In Ohio

The Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company uses live trapping to get squirrels out of homes, attics, yards, eves, soffits, chimneys, roofs, sheds, garages, gardens and lofts on behalf of Ohio homeowners and businesses. The CWR squirrel control and prevention service area includes Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati, Akron and other Ohio cities.

To keep squirrels out of your attic you need to be as tenacious as they are. The experts at CWR recommend that you devise a good strategy to deal with the little varmints. Consider removing bird feeders, secure your garbage cans, cut back tree limbs near your roof, set trapping cages in your attic and install a EVICTOR strobe light in your attic – or simply have the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company do the work.

Humane Squirrel Control And Exclusion Options

If you want be as humane as possible to avoid hurting squirrels, you can wait until after the squirrels have left during the day, and then seal up your roof and attic with metal flashing to prevent them from re-opening access points into your attic.

If your are going to try to become a master of DIY squirrel exclusion, be sure to secure your ladder before attempting to squirrel proof your roof. Sometimes, not every time, but sometimes, this job is best left to the professionals at CRW.

CWR uses professional squirrel trapping supplies, tools, heavy duty protective gear and modern squirrel removal equipment such as humane live traps, Safeguard squirrel traps and excluders, small game snare traps and WCS special squirrel cage traps.

CWR squirrel control experts use effective natural and chemical squirrel repellents, squirrel traps for gutters, ladders, chimney caps, squirrel control wire mesh, hammers, owl decoys, tunnel traps, screwdrivers, electronic squirrel control products, electric garden fencing, ultrasonic pest repellers and excluders for squirrels. One of the CWR’s favorite squirrel traps is a version of a Tomahawk live trap with one trap door and an easy release door.

After we trap, catch and remove the pesky squirrels, we seal up their entry points to keep other squirrels from getting in. CWR pest control technicians know how to keep annoying squirrels away naturally and how to get rid of Eastern Fox Squirrels around the yard. We are also experts at getting rid of flying squirrels and how to get rid of squirrels from attics. We remove squirrel poop, rodent droppings and also disinfect and sanitize attics that squirrels have compromised.

Found An Orphaned Or Injured Baby Wild Animal? [Information From The Humane Society Of The United States]

How to tell if baby animals are orphaned, injured or perfectly fine—and what to do if they need your help

It’s common to see baby wild animals outside during spring, as a new generation makes its way into the world. Baby wild animals might seem like they need our help, but unless the animal is truly orphaned or injured, there is no need to rescue them. These tips can help you decide whether to take action.

Signs that a wild animal needs your help

  • The animal is brought to you by a cat or dog.
  • There’s evidence of bleeding.
  • The animal has an apparent or obvious broken limb.
  • A bird is featherless or nearly featherless and on the ground.
  • The animal is shivering.
  • There’s a dead parent nearby.
  • The animal is crying and wandering all day long.

If you see any of these signs, find help for the animal. If necessary, safely capture and transport them to the appropriate place for treatment.

Handling Gloves on Amazon.com

Tips for birds, rabbits, squirrels and other species

Whether an animal is orphaned and needs your help depends on their age, species and behavior. Babies of some species are left alone all day and rely on camouflage for protection, while others are tightly supervised by their parents. Read on for descriptions of what’s normal for each species.

Baby birds

If baby birds are clearly injured or in imminent danger, contact a licensed wildlife rehabilitator. If featherless or nearly featherless baby birds have fallen from their nest but appear unharmed, put them back in the nest if you can do so without danger to yourself. (It is a myth that birds will abandon their young if a person touches them.)

Fully feathered birds: If the original nest was destroyed or is too high to reach, hang a small, shallow wicker basket close to where the original nest was. Woven stick baskets from garden stores or supermarket floral departments work well; they resemble natural nests and allow rain to pass through so the birds won’t drown. Adult birds won’t jump into anything they cannot see out of, so make sure the basket is not too deep. Put the fallen babies into the new nest and keep watch from a distance for an hour to make sure the parent birds return to the new nest to feed their chicks. Watch closely, because parent birds can be quite stealthy. If they definitely do not return, contact a licensed wildlife rehabilitator.

Nearly or mostly featherless birds: These birds will become too cold in a makeshift nest, so you must place them in the original nest. If that’s not possible, take them to a licensed wildlife rehabilitator. Remember that baby birds do best when raised by their parents or other birds, so try to reunite them with their parents before calling a rehabilitator.

Fledglings: Birds with fully feathered bodies, but short or non-existent tail feathers may be fledglings (adolescent birds who have left the nest). You might see them hopping on the ground, unable to fly. This is normal; birds learn to fly from the ground up! Fledglings might remain on the ground for a few days or even a week, supervised and fed by their parents a few times each hour before they get the hang of flying. You can tell if the fledglings are being fed by watching from a distance to see whether a parent bird flies over to them, usually a few times an hour. You can also look for white-grey feces near the fledgling. Birds defecate after being fed, so the presence of fecal material means that the birds are being cared for. Be sure to keep cats indoors and dogs leashed until the fledglings are old enough to fly. If you are positive that the parents aren’t returning to feed the babies, contact a licensed wildlife rehabilitator.

Baby rabbits

Rabbits at least four inches long with open eyes and erect ears and who hop well are independent from their mother and should be allowed to fend for themselves. Uninjured baby rabbits in an intact nest should also be left alone. Although they might look abandoned because their mom isn’t around, mother rabbits visit their dependent young only a few times a day to avoid attracting predators. If the nest has been disturbed, lightly cover it with natural materials you find around the nest, like grass, fur or leaves and follow these steps:

  • Keep all pets out of the area.
  • Avoid touching the babies, because foreign smells may cause the mother to abandon their young.
  • Use yarn or string to make a tic-tac-toe pattern over the nest to assess whether the mother is returning to nurse their young. Check back 24 hours later.
  • If the yarn or string was moved aside, but the nest is still covered with fur, grass or leaves, the mother has returned to nurse the babies.
  • If the “X” remains undisturbed for 24 hours, contact a licensed wildlife rehabilitator.

Baby squirrels

A squirrel who is nearly full-sized, has a full and fluffy tail and can run, jump and climb is independent. However, if a juvenile squirrel continuously approaches and follows people, their mom is probably gone. In this case, you should contact a rehabilitator because the baby is very hungry and needs care.

There are a few cases where you might need to intervene:

  • A baby squirrel falls from a nest.
  • A nest falls from a tree.
  • A felled tree contains an intact nest.

If the baby and/or their nest fell from the tree today, give the mother squirrel a chance to reclaim their young and relocate them to a new nest. If the baby is uninjured, leave them where they are, leave the area, keep people and pets away and monitor them from a safe distance.

If it’s chilly outside or the baby isn’t fully furred, place them in a shoebox with something warm underneath (like a heating pad on a low setting or a hot water bottle). Be sure to put a flannel shirt between the baby and the heating device, or they could overheat. Do not cover them with anything or the mother might not be able to find them.

If the babies are not retrieved by dusk, take these steps:

  • Wearing thick gloves, gather the squirrels and place them inside a thick, soft cloth, such as a cloth diaper or fleece scarf or hat.
  • Place one of the following items beneath the cloth: A chemical hand warmer inside a sock, a hot water bottle (replace the hot water every 30 minutes) or a heating pad set on the lowest setting. (If the heating pad has no cover, put it inside two pillowcases so the babies don’t overheat.)
  • Place the baby squirrels, cloth and warmer inside a small cardboard box or carrier. Call a wildlife rehabilitator.

Baby deer

People often mistakenly assume that a fawn (baby deer) found alone is orphaned. If the fawn is lying down calmly and quietly, their mother is nearby and they are OK. A doe only visits and nurses their fawn a few times a day to avoid attracting predators. Unless you know that the mother is dead, leave the fawn alone.

Although mother deer are wary of human smells, they still want their babies back. If you already handled the fawn, quickly return the fawn to the exact spot where you found them and leave the area; the mother deer will not show herself until you are gone.

If the fawn is lying on their side or wandering and crying incessantly all day, they probably need help. If this is the case, contact a licensed wildlife rehabilitator.

Baby foxes

Fox kits will often appear unsupervised for long periods while their parents are out hunting for food. They will play like puppies around the den site until the parents decide they’re old enough to go on hunting trips. Then they will suddenly disappear. Observe the kits from a distance; if they seem energetic and healthy, leave them alone. If they appear sickly or weak, or if you have reason to believe both parents are dead, contact a licensed wildlife rehabilitator.

Baby opossums

Baby opossums are born as embryos, barely larger than a bee, and spend about two months nursing in their mother’s pouch. When they get to be about three to four inches long and start riding around on their mother’s back, they may fall off without the mother noticing. As a general rule, if an opossum is over seven inches long (not including the tail), they’re old enough to be on their own. If they’re less than seven inches long (not including the tail), they are orphaned and you should contact a licensed wildlife rehabilitator.

Baby raccoons

If a baby raccoon has been alone for more than a few hours, they are probably an orphan. Mother raccoons don’t let their young out of their sight for long. Put an inverted laundry basket over the baby (with a light weight on top so they cannot push their way out) and monitor them until well into the nighttime hours (raccoons are nocturnal, so the mom should come out at night to reclaim her baby). You can also put the cub in a pet carrier and close the door. Instead of latching it, prop it closed with an angled stick. When the mother returns, she’ll run in front of the carrier, push over the stick and the door will pop open.

If the mother does not return, contact a licensed wildlife rehabilitator. In spring and summer, people often set traps in a misguided effort to resolve garbage and other “nuisance” issues. Unfortunately, this approach leads to trapped and killed mothers who leave their starving young behind. If anyone in your neighborhood is setting traps, persuade them to use more humane and effective methods instead.

Baby skunks

If you see a baby skunk (or a line of baby skunks, nose-to-tail) running around without a mother in sight, they could be orphaned. Skunks have poor eyesight, so if something scares the mother and they run off, the babies can quickly lose sight of them.

Monitor the situation to see if the mother rejoins their young. If the babies are on the move, put on gloves and slowly place a plastic laundry basket (with lattice sides) over the babies to keep them in one spot and make it easier for the mother to find them. Do not put a weight on top of the laundry basket.

If the mother returns to her young, she will flip up the basket and get them. If she has trouble doing this, you should lift the basket to let them out. Remember that skunks are very near-sighted, so fast movements can startle them into spraying. If you move slowly and speak softly though, you will not get sprayed. Skunks warn potential predators by stamping their front feet when they’re alarmed, so if the mother doesn’t do this, you’re safe to proceed. If no mother comes to retrieve the young by dawn, contact a licensed wildlife rehabilitator.

Finding help for the animal

Once you’re sure the animal needs your help, call a wildlife rehabilitator for assistance. If you’re unable to locate a rehabilitator, try contacting an animal shelter, humane society, animal control agency, nature center, state wildlife agency or veterinarian.

Capturing and transporting the animal

Never handle an adult animal without first consulting a wildlife professional. Even small animals can injure you. Once you’ve contacted someone who can help, describe the animal and their physical condition as accurately as possible.

Unless you are told otherwise, here’s how you can make an animal more comfortable for transport while you’re waiting for help to arrive:

  1. Put the animal in a safe container. For most songbirds, a brown paper bag is fine for transport. For larger birds or other animals, use a cardboard box or similar container. First, punch holes for air (not while the animal is in the box!) from the inside out and line the box with an old T-shirt or other soft cloth. Then put the animal in the box.
  2. Put on thick gloves and cover the animal with a towel or pillowcase as you scoop them up gently and place them in the container.
  3. Do not give the animal food or water. It could be the wrong food and cause them to choke, trigger serious digestive problems or cause aspiration pneumonia. Many injured animals are in shock and force-feeding can kill them.
  4. Place the container in a warm, dark, quiet place—away from pets, children and all noise (including the TV and the radio)—until you can transport the animal. Keep the container away from direct sunlight, air conditioning or heat.
  5. Transport the animal as soon as possible. Leave the radio off and keep talking to a minimum. Because wild animals aren’t accustomed to our voices, they can become very stressed by our noises. If they’re injured or orphaned, they’re already in a compromised condition. Keep their world dark and quiet to lower their stress level and help keep them alive.

CWR Cleans Attics After Raccoons, Squirrels, Bats, Birds, Mice And Rodents

You can hire a professional raccoon removal and exclusion service such as the Cottom's Wildlife Removal company or do-it-yourself.

Although kids in Ohio think that raccoons look like cute cuddly bandits because of their signature black masks, adults know all to well that they are well adapted to urban living, are expert thieves and can be a nuisance – and a potential health hazard.

Before you try to clean an attic after a raccoon infestation, you have to first get rid of raccoons and keep them out. You can hire a professional raccoon removal and exclusion service such as the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal company or do-it-yourself.

Please do not use an attic fogger, bug bomb or a smoke bomb to get rid of raccoons because it is not humane. The most humane way to get rid of raccoons in an attic or chimney is to use a one-way door and exclude them from returning.

Learn how you sanitize an attic after rodents, here. Get a quote for raccoon attic cleanup costs, here. Request raccoon cleanup services, here. Find out about attic cleanup and decontamination, here. Schedule a time to have your attic inspected for raccoon damage, here.

Schedule a time for attic cleanup services near Cleveland, Columbus or Cincinnati, Ohio, here. Find out how to clean up after a raccoon, here.

Watch a video from the Humane Society of the Unites States to learn how to humanely get raccoons out of an attic, here. Get tips on cleaning an attic after a raccoon, here (PDF).

The hollow smoky compartments in chimneys are similar to burned out hollow trees which are popular with pregnant raccoons. The raccoon removal and attic cleanup experts at the Cottom’s Wildlife Company are proficient at removing raccoons from chimneys in Ohio homes. CWR raccoon removal specialists get raccoons out of roofs, attics, yards, chimneys, garages, walls, garbage and out from under decks in Cleveland, Columbus and Cincinnati.

The professionals at the Cottom’s Wildlife Removal firm have been cleaning up attics after raccoons, removing bat guano from attics and getting rid of animal feces in attics in Ohio homes since 1986. CWR pest control technicians also provide rodent dropping cleanup, sanitizing and disinfecting services for Ohio homeowners.

After raccoons have invaded an attic, odor removal services are frequently requested by CWR customers. For animal feces removal and attic cleanup services in Columbus, Ohio please call CWR at 614-300-2763.

CWR wildlife damage management specialists safely repair attics, soffits, gutters, siding, shingles, roofs, chimney caps and vents for Ohio homeowners. Get more information about attic repair and decontamination services in Ohio, here.

Cleaning Up After Rodents

Spray any urine, droppings, and nesting materials with either a bleach and water solution (1 parts bleach to 9 parts water) or a household disinfectant prepared according to the label instructions for dilution and disinfection time. Soak well. This will inactivate any virus. Use a paper towel or rag to pick up the materials and dispose of them. Read more here.

Raccoon Latrines: Identification and Clean-up – CDC [PDF]

Fill a bucket with hot, soapy water. Feces and material contaminated with raccoon feces should be removed (using a shovel or inverted plastic bag) and burned, buried, or bagged and placed in the trash to be sent to a landfill. Use a damp (but not wet) sponge to wipe the area. Read more here (PDF).

Ohio Wildlife Information And Wildlife Services

Division of Wildlife | Ohio Department of Natural Resources

A department of incredible diversity, ODNR owns and manages more than 800,000 acres of land, including 75 state parks, 24 state forests, 138 state nature preserves, and 150 wildlife areas.

The Division of Wildlife’s mission is to conserve and improve fish and wildlife resources and their habitats for sustainable use and appreciation by all.

Customer Service
1-800-WILDLIFE (945-3543)
wildinfo@dnr.ohio.gov
Monday – Friday 8AM – 5PM EST

Report a Wildlife Violation
1-800-POACHER (762-2437)
Report online

County Wildlife Officers

State Headquarters
2045 Morse Road
Building G
Columbus, OH, 43229
1-800-WILDLIFE (945-3543)

Ohio Division of Wildlife On Facebook

Download The Ohio Nuisance Wild Animal Control Certification Manual PDF Here - The Commercial Nuisance Wild Animal Control Operator License is considered a specialty license. Information regarding this license, including the test, study materials and application can be found at wildohio.gov.

Download The Ohio Nuisance Wild Animal Control Certification Manual PDF Here – The Commercial Nuisance Wild Animal Control Operator License is considered a specialty license. Information regarding this license, including the test, study materials and application can be found at wildohio.gov.

Information On Wildlife Services In Ohio From The ODNR

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) is the Ohio state government agency charged with ensuring “a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all.” Ohio wildlife officials rescue injured bald eagles.

ODNR regulates the oil and gas industry, the mining industry, hunting and fishing, and dams, while maintaining natural resources such as state parks, state nature preserves, state wildlife areas, state forests, and state waterways. It was created in 1949 by the Ohio Legislature.

In May of 2021, the Ohio Department of Natural Resources and the Department of Mental Health kicked off Mental Health Awareness month by pairing up to create a new initiative called “Thrive Outside.”

The ODNR Division of Wildlife stocked more that 40 million sport fish in Ohio’s waters in 2020, including channel catfish, walleye, steelhead, saugeye, muskellunge, brown trout, rainbow trout, blue catfish, and hybrid striped bass.

In addition, ODNR licenses all hunting, fishing, and watercraft in the state and is responsible for overseeing and permitting all mineral extraction, monitoring dam safety, managing water resources, coordinating the activity of Ohio’s 88 county soil and water conservation districts, mapping the state’s major geologic structures and mineral resources, and promoting recycling and litter prevention through grant programs in local communities.

Visit The Website For The Ohio Department Of Natural Resources - Department Of Wildlife. The government agency in Ohio, ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. The Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) owns and manages more than 590,000 acres of land including 74 state parks, 21 state forests, 136 state nature preserves, and 117 wildlife areas. The department also has jurisdiction over more than 120,000 acres of inland waters; 7,000 miles of streams; 481 miles of Ohio River; and 2-1/4 million acres of Lake Erie.

Visit the website for the Ohio Department Of Natural Resources – Department Of Wildlife. The government agency in Ohio, ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. The Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) owns and manages more than 590,000 acres of land including 74 state parks, 21 state forests, 136 state nature preserves, and 117 wildlife areas. The department also has jurisdiction over more than 120,000 acres of inland waters; 7,000 miles of streams; 481 miles of Ohio River; and 2-1/4 million acres of Lake Erie.

Download the

Download the “Mammals Of Ohio Field Guide” from the Ohio Department Of Wildlife, here. This booklet is produced by the ODNR Division of Wildlife as a free publication.

Minimum Standards For Wildlife Rehabilitation In Ohio - Download the PDF from the Ohio Department Of Natural Resources.

Minimum Standards For Wildlife Rehabilitation In Ohio – Download the PDF from the Ohio Department Of Natural Resources, here.

Wildlife Services State Offices – USDA APHIS
U.S. Department Of Agriculture – Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service

Wildlife Services State Director: Andrew J. Montoney, Ohio
4469 Professional Parkway
Groveport, OH 43125
Phone: 614-993-3444
FAX: 614-836-5597
Toll-Free Number: 1-866-4USDAWS
(1-866-487-3297)
Andrew.j.montoney@aphis.usda.gov
www.aphis.usda.gov/wildlife-damage/

USDA Resolves Wildlife Conflicts in Ohio

Every day, the Wildlife Services (WS) program in Ohio helps citizens, organizations, industries, and Government agencies resolve conflicts with wildlife to protect agriculture, other property, and natural resources, and to safeguard human health and safety. WS’ professional wildlife biologists and specialists implement effective, selective, and responsible strategies that value wildlife, the environment, and the resources being protected. WS manages wildlife damage according to its public trust stewardship responsibilities as a Federal natural resource management program. The program supports the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation, based on the principle that wildlife resources are owned collectively and held in trust by Government for the benefit of present and future generations.

WS oversees a multitude of programs and projects within Ohio to resolve human/wildlife conflicts. WS works on airports to prevent aircraft-wildlife collisions. WS conducts disease surveillance to monitor wildlife diseases that threaten the health of people, pets, livestock, and wildlife. WS provides leadership and is a member of the Ohio Rabies Taskforce, and works year-round to stop raccoon variant rabies (RVR) from spreading westward and to eliminate the disease from the State.

Ohio’s livestock producers and crop farmers rely on WS’ expertise in resolving conflicts with wildlife such as coyotes, black vultures, feral swine, and blackbirds. As a member of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Task Force, WS-Ohio works to reduce predation on threatened species of turtles, manage mute swans to support trumpeter swan introduction and eliminate feral swine populations to protect natural resources and agriculture in the Lake Erie Region of Ohio. WS works with local communities to reduce wildlife conflicts in urban areas.

Download the full report in PDF format,  here.

The Ohio Wildlife Center, is located in Powell, Ohio (614-734-9453) and was founded in 1984. It offers humane pest control and animal rehabilitation services while fostering awareness and appreciation for Ohio's native wildlife through rehabilitation, education and wildlife health studies. They are a 501c3 nonprofit that operates the state's largest, donation-supported Wildlife Hospital with on-site veterinary care. They serve the local community and state in wildlife rescues and rehabilitation. The Center receives no operational funds from any local, state, or federal government tax funding. The Ohio Wildlife Center is a premier nonprofit wildlife rehabilitation organization, nationally recognized as an authority on native Ohio wildlife issues. The Ohio Wildlife Center was founded in 1984 by Animal Care Unlimited veterinarian, Dr. Donald L. Burton. The Ohio Wildlife Center's Hospital (614-793-9453) is located at 2661 Billingsley Rd, Columbus, OH 43235. Ohio Wildlife Center partners with hundreds of volunteers across all areas of the organization to make their mission possible. Volunteers can normally choose to work in wildlife care, education, InfoLine services, transport, produce pickup, special events, community outreach, and office support.

The Ohio Wildlife Center, is located at 6131 Cook Road in Powell, Ohio (614-734-9453) and was founded in 1984. It offers humane pest control and animal rehabilitation services while fostering awareness and appreciation for Ohio’s native wildlife through rehabilitation, education and wildlife health studies. They are a 501c3 nonprofit that operates the state’s largest, donation-supported Wildlife Hospital with on-site veterinary care. They serve the local community and state in wildlife rescues and rehabilitation. The Center receives no operational funds from any local, state, or federal government tax funding. The Ohio Wildlife Center is a premier nonprofit wildlife rehabilitation organization, nationally recognized as an authority on native Ohio wildlife issues. The Ohio Wildlife Center was founded in 1984 by Animal Care Unlimited veterinarian, Dr. Donald L. Burton. The Ohio Wildlife Center’s Hospital (614-793-9453) is located at 2661 Billingsley Rd, Columbus, OH 43235. Ohio Wildlife Center partners with hundreds of volunteers across all areas of the organization to make their mission possible. Volunteers can normally choose to work in wildlife care, education, InfoLine services, transport, produce pickup, special events, community outreach, and office support.

Ohio Wildlife Center

The Ohio Wildlife Center offers humane pest control and animal rehabilitation services while fostering awareness and appreciation for Ohio’s native wildlife through rehabilitation, education and wildlife health studies.

Ohio Wildlife Center
Education & Administration
Business calls only. Scheduled programs.
6131 Cook Rd
Powell, Ohio 43065
614-734- 9453

Ohio Wildlife Center’s Hospital
Animal Admissions
2661 Billingsley Rd
Columbus, Ohio 43235
614-793-9453
Mon-Fri, 9am – 5pm
Sat-Sun 9am – 3pm

The state’s largest, donation-supported Wildlife Hospital with on-site veterinary care, treating more than 6,000 patients each year representing more than 150 species from more than 60 of Ohio’s 88 counties.

A 20-acre outdoor Education Center with more than 50 Animal Ambassadors that greet visitors during our public events, camps and group programming.

SCRAM! Wildlife Control, a fee-for-service solution for human-wildlife conflicts to assist central Ohio home and business owners with access to humane wildlife eviction and exclusion services. SCRAM! has operated since 2001.

Wildlife assistance for the public via social media and phone for step-by-step guidance with wildlife issues and questions.

Volunteer and internship opportunities – more than 250 volunteers annually participate in volunteer services in animal care, education programming, events and administrative support.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service | Ohio Field Office
Midwest Region – Ohio Ecological Services Office

4625 Morse Road, Suite 104
Columbus, OH 43230
phone: 614-416-8993
e-mail: ohio@fws.gov
www.fws.gov/midwest/ohio/

The service works with public and private entities to conserve and restore Ohio’s endangered species, migratory birds, wetlands, and other important fish and wildlife resources.

The Ohio Field Office is the home of the Fish and Wildlife Service, Ecological Services Division, for the state of Ohio. They cover projects on or affecting all the land and water within Ohio as well as the western basin of Lake Erie.

The mission of the Fish and Wildlife Service is “working with others, to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife, and plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.” The Ohio Field Office uses that mission statement to guide all their our activities.

Ohio Wildlife Field Guides And Backyard Wildlife [Download PDFs From The Ohio Department Of Natural Resources]

List Of Mammals Of Ohio

This list of mammals of Ohio includes a total of 70 mammal species recorded in the state of Ohio. Of these, three (the American black bear, Indiana bat, and Allegheny woodrat) are listed as endangered in the state; four (the brown rat, black rat, house mouse, and wild boar) are introduced; two (the gray bat and Mexican free-tailed bat) are considered accidental; and eight (the American bison, elk, fisher cougar, Canada lynx, gray wolf, American marten, and wolverine) have been extirpated from the state. Read more here.

Raccoons In Ohio [From The Ohio Department Of Health]

Raccoons can be found throughout the state and in all habitat types, with the majority being found in northwestern and central Ohio along rivers and streams bordering farmland habitats. They have also moved into suburban and urban areas and can live almost any place where there is food for them to eat and a den to serve as shelter. Many of them live, temporarily at least, in drain tiles and sewer systems. Raccoons defecate in communal sites called latrines. They are nocturnal and are up and about during the dark hours of the night. Even though raccoons do not really hibernate, they can sleep for days, and even weeks at a time, during the cold winter months. Read more here.

About Wildlife In Ohio